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Log pile

B3B3 South East LondonPosts: 24,035
I have a log pile - dead ancient apple tree. The pile has been in situ for about 3years. I would like to move it, but it's not essential. Is there a good time to move it? I don't know what's lurking there. I leave it in peace.
In London. Keen but lazy.
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  • Hi B3 
    i have log piles I have created under a few mature tree. I produce then for insects to overwinter in and hedge hogs to hibernate in
    Me personally, If you wish to remove the pile then I would leave till at least the late spring if so any insects etc are not effected by the removal, or leave and let nature take it’s cause


  • B3B3 South East LondonPosts: 24,035
    Thanks Steve.
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 8,855
    Moving it now would give the birds a winter feast of sleepy bugs but I'd probably agree with Steve in case there's amphibians or reptiles hibernating in there.
    Tradition is just peer pressure from dead people
  • B3B3 South East LondonPosts: 24,035
    I'll leave it for now. I'm assuming a shady place would be best when I eventually resite it.
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 6,324
    Yes, shade - the fungi will get to work and break it into food for bugs much more successfully if it's generally a bit damp. 
    The warmer the weather when you disturb the pile - especially at night - the better able anything living in there will be to relocate. Best to do it gradually, rather than move it all one day, so a small disturbance one day causes creatures to move away over the next day or so, when conditions suit them to move and you're not close by. Then move the rest - a bit like Monty clearing his pond. Give things a chance to get away on their own.
    “Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first” 
  • B3B3 South East LondonPosts: 24,035
    Will do. 
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 8,855
    My favourite spot is the North side of a hedge in a damp corner. It's protected from the sun but still gets some of the warmth. The best approach though is to have several piles in different areas if you can do it.
    Tradition is just peer pressure from dead people
  • B3B3 South East LondonPosts: 24,035
    I haven't got an awful lot of logs so I'm not sure whether I could divide it up. It's mainly the branches from an old apple tree. The trunk was left in situ. 
    What's the smallest practical size?
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • Hi B3 
    From 1”up to 4” in diameter. Most of my log piles are the same diameter across as they are easier to stack up but any size will do imo 
  • B3B3 South East LondonPosts: 24,035
    @greenfingers steve Do you really means inches? Anyway I've got the idea that size doesn't matter ;)
    In London. Keen but lazy.
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