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Identify plant please?

KiliKili Posts: 1,103
edited December 2018 in Plants
Hi guys, I need your help please but, before I do that may I wish you all the best for 2019 and may you and your families enjoy good health and happiness and have fun gardening next year.


My request to you is to identify the plant in the image above. Some background to how this plant got into my garden. I was fortunate enough to be able to collect a lot of free peat/compost from one of the local plant nurseries which ship plug plants to the UK each year. Each year they tip out all the old compost into a skip which they have to pay to have dumped as the local authority make a charge to do so hence, they are happy for anyone to take as much as they want , which I do, however, included in the peat/compost are lost of tiny plug plants which have not been sold but dumped.
The plants in the image are whats shot up since I placed a barrow load of peat onto the small patch of ground at the back of my house early summer 2018 and I would be interested to know what they are with a mind to transplanting them elsewhere in the garden should they grow into something nice. Or is it a weed?

Many Thanks for your help and once again Happy New year to you.

Regards

Kili

'The power of accurate observation .... is commonly called cynicism by those that have not got it.

George Bernard Shaw'

Posts

  • One of the violet family ... possibly Viola odorata or Viola riviniana ... the first is the scented Sweet violet the second is known as a dog violet, pretty but unscented. 

    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • KiliKili Posts: 1,103
    Why thank you Dove for the quick and informative response.

    I may move them to a planter at the front of the house in that case. Would they transplant okay given that one has a flower on it now?

    Many Thanks
    Kili

    'The power of accurate observation .... is commonly called cynicism by those that have not got it.

    George Bernard Shaw'

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 87,904
    edited December 2018
    I think they’ll transplant just fine ... they’re pretty tough .... for what it’s worth I think they’re best allowed to naturalise in ‘wildlife corners’ and under hedgerows etc. We have them in a shrubby area behind the pond ... some folk find them a bit ‘invasive’ in more formal areas. 
    Enjoy  :) and a very happy new year to you too. 

    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • RubytooRubytoo Posts: 1,596
    Yes it is one of the violets, and I think because of the leaves it is one of the sweet ones like Queen Charlotte, which we have here.
    Though I may be wrong to the exact named variety, the shape and shade and veins on the leaves look very similar to ours. Are the flowers very strongly scented?
    They make a lovely little posy with a few long stemmed leaves around them, just right for a miniature jam jar.

    I think they are the type the (Victorian?) flower sellers used to use as they tie into nice little bunches with the large thick leaves. Even the leaves have a vaguely nice smell to them too.

    What a great way to get new plants, as long as you can find out what you are growing, fun too :D
    Happy Gardening and New year to you too :)
  • KiliKili Posts: 1,103
    Thank you Dove and Rubytoo. On second thoughts I might just leave them where they are for now as they seem to be spreading nicely and will hopefully cover the small patch of ground which lies empty except when the Rhubarb plant pops up in spring.

    Thank you once again

    Kili

    'The power of accurate observation .... is commonly called cynicism by those that have not got it.

    George Bernard Shaw'

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