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  • @Obelixx I will try to do something but this is going to test my drawing skills :)

    The 5 black bits on top are windows, the 2 blue bits are patio door and the yellow section is for the patio slabs.



  • andymg0907andymg0907 Posts: 7
    edited December 2018
    hogweed said:
    One thing you need to decide is if you are a geometric type of person (straight lines, rectangles etc) or an organic type of person (circles, curves etc). Then depending on what you are, sit down with your plan and tracing paper with either a ruler or protractor & a set of French curves (or flexible line) and draw out your garden. Mark out the patio first and be generous with it, then mark out any paths you need to a shed or washing line, then insert your lawn and borders. 
    There are lots of good cheap books on garden designs for small gardens. Invest in the time now and reap the rewards in the years to come. 
    In all our previous houses we have been very conservative but this time I want to be bit more adventurous and go with some circles, curves etc. 
  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 7,952
    edited December 2018
    I may have missed it, but when are these plants arriving, and how are you going to care for them until the borders are ready?
    Somewhere in my heart
    There is a star that shines for you
    Silver splits the blue
    Love will see it through
  • Dubloon said:
    Is it just me or are these comments from fellow gardeners unreasonably negative and critical? This person is asking for our help and ideas....of course, the books say plan your garden before you plant anything etc. etc. but if you're a mad keen gardener then it's hard to be patient. I say go for it; plant where you think they will do best (consult online etc. where you can) and you can always move them. That's the great thing about a garden; it is probably the most flexible, creative blank canvas out there. Make a mistake...well just dig up the plant and try again. Good luck with your garden and enjoy it. 
    @Dubloon. My thoughts are exactly the same, none of this is cast in stone so if things don't work it can always be reworked upon - beauty of gardening.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 19,932
    I'm confused now.  The photos show two separate square looking slabs of terrace but your yellow line is long and narrow.

    Instead of drawing it on the PC, try drawing it on paper to scale as I have suggested and then take a picture to post on here.

    As for circles and curves, get out the tracing paper and some string or a protactor, cups, glasses, whatever to draw curves and circles.   You can also use a hose-pipe laid out on teh ground and then look at the shapes form all angles, including upstairs windows, to see that it pleases or still needs tweaking.

    Last thing to establish is ownership of that wall.  If it's yours, you can happily drill into it to attach fixings for trellis panels or tensioned wires for growing climbers which can be fruiting or just ornamental roses/clematis/honeysuckle/wisteria.....  If not, you'll have ask permission or erect posts in front of it to carry wires or trellis panels.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Obelixx said:
    I'm confused now.  The photos show two separate square looking slabs of terrace but your yellow line is long and narrow.

    Instead of drawing it on the PC, try drawing it on paper to scale as I have suggested and then take a picture to post on here.

    As for circles and curves, get out the tracing paper and some string or a protactor, cups, glasses, whatever to draw curves and circles.   You can also use a hose-pipe laid out on teh ground and then look at the shapes form all angles, including upstairs windows, to see that it pleases or still needs tweaking.

    Last thing to establish is ownership of that wall.  If it's yours, you can happily drill into it to attach fixings for trellis panels or tensioned wires for growing climbers which can be fruiting or just ornamental roses/clematis/honeysuckle/wisteria.....  If not, you'll have ask permission or erect posts in front of it to carry wires or trellis panels.
    The gap in between two squares will be filled in, I'm just waiting for the slabs to arrive.

    The wall to the right is owned by ourselves, the one to left is neighbors. We were planning to use trellis or posts for either walls as ideally we do not want to drill in the wall. 
  • Papi JoPapi Jo Brittany, France Posts: 2,540
    edited December 2018
    hogweed said:
    One thing you need to decide is if you are a geometric type of person (straight lines, rectangles etc) or an organic type of person (circles, curves etc).
    Interesting remark, @hogweed. We also had a "placer vs plonker" discussion (and poll) on this forum.
    I know that the old trick of the watering hose to make borders with curves is regularly mentioned in articles & books, especially for small gardens. And I did that with my first ornamental garden some 20 years ago. However, now I hold that curves are not necessarily a good idea for the smallish garden. Actually, my model in this matter is the traditional English mixed border, all straight (geometric) lines, the curves are drawn by the plants themselves, which overlap here and there over the lawn.
    Pic taken last May showing part of my mixed borders. Certainly not meant to be a model, just to show what can be achieved in the period of 4 years only.


    You are invited to a virtual visit of my garden (in English or in French).
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