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Garden design guidance/advice

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  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 15,760
    Just notice, the whole garden faces north so will need plants that prefer shade. 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Papi JoPapi Jo Brittany, France Posts: 2,551
    edited December 2018
    Lyn said:
    Just notice, the whole garden faces north so will need plants that prefer shade. 
    Well, it depends what there is South of the garden: building, wall, street, open space, etc.
    You are invited to a virtual visit of my garden (in English or in French).
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 20,049
    If that brown rectangle to the left is the house then the garden faces east and the longest side faces south.   
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Is it just me or are these comments from fellow gardeners unreasonably negative and critical? This person is asking for our help and ideas....of course, the books say plan your garden before you plant anything etc. etc. but if you're a mad keen gardener then it's hard to be patient. I say go for it; plant where you think they will do best (consult online etc. where you can) and you can always move them. That's the great thing about a garden; it is probably the most flexible, creative blank canvas out there. Make a mistake...well just dig up the plant and try again. Good luck with your garden and enjoy it. 
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 60,728
    edited December 2018
    Dubloon says ‘consult online’ and that’s just what the poster has done.
    Dont think we’re intentionally critical ... hope it doesn’t come over like that ... just pointing out some unforeseen stuff and trying to come up with helpful solutions. 
    Its hard online to get the tone right especially when pointing out problems ... but we’ve all been beginners and all made mistakes and most of us continue to make some ... what we want to do is give folk who ask for our help the benefit of our own experience without coming over as bossyboots. 
    We enjoy gardening and want to help others enjoy it too. 
     :) 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 20,049
    The OP has asked for planting planning advice.   We are simply listing all the things to take into consideration and I have told them how to go about doing it on paper before committing to planting, thus reducing the margins for error which would lead to plant losses down the line and/or the need to re-jig.

    It's not that dissimilar to furnishing a house - you measure the rooms and amount of natural light and what the rooms will be used for and work out how people will move and live within it before you choose the furniture and light fittings otherwise it'll be money and effort wasted.  
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • As I mentioned in my initial post, I'm looking for planting advice and some ideas on overall garden layout. The helpful advice from @Obelixx does give me some good ideas as to how to go about the planting. 

    @Topbird The fruit trees are draft root stalk and are self pollinating (hence only single tree of each variety). 

    To be frank they are all the kind of plants that we want e.g. mix of evergreen, fruit and other plant bringing bit of interest through-out the year.

    We will have 25-30 plants in total to be planted on edges ( edge alone works out to about 35-40 mtrs), quite a few of them are small shrubs and most of them will take time to mature. Some will be low height so will be staggered and planted near the ones that could potentially grow tall. 

    The turfing will be in the middle area and will be using all the available edges for planting the plants and shrubs.

    Instead of doing the turf in the usual rectangular pattern, it would be great to create some of sort curves lines and make the area bit more interesting.

    I have put some pictures.




  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 20,049
    OK - re-draw your plan with the hardscaping/terraces marked on it and also showing where the house windows and door are as that affects design given that much of British life involves looking at your garden in the rain and paths are most practical when they go from the door to their destination.

    Once we have that perspective we can help you more with lawn placement and shape but don't get hung up on having it in the middle.   Moving it off centre will give you wider borders to one side.

    The other thing is to use that magnificent wall.  If that is on the south facing side it will absorb heat from the sun and give it back at night which makes a huge difference to how well fruit bearing plants will crop.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 60,728
    That is indeed a magnificent wall ... I am deeply envious .... you need some special plants that will show it and themselves off to their best advantage in front of that ... can I reiterate my deep envy mrgreen... we only have fences ............

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • hogweedhogweed Central ScotlandPosts: 3,975
    One thing you need to decide is if you are a geometric type of person (straight lines, rectangles etc) or an organic type of person (circles, curves etc). Then depending on what you are, sit down with your plan and tracing paper with either a ruler or protractor & a set of French curves (or flexible line) and draw out your garden. Mark out the patio first and be generous with it, then mark out any paths you need to a shed or washing line, then insert your lawn and borders. 
    There are lots of good cheap books on garden designs for small gardens. Invest in the time now and reap the rewards in the years to come. 
    'Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement' - Helen Keller
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