Black mold on Eucalyptus

Hi all

I wonder if anyone can give me any advice in relation to my Eucalyptus tree. 

We bought it from a nursery in spring this year and planted it in the garden. Within a couple of months it had grown from a 3/4 foot plant up to almost 6 foot... Which although was great to see, was too much for where we had planted it. 

We then potted it and left it for the remainder of the summer and while it shot up.a bit further it was limited to a more sensible size.

However as the winter set in the leaves started to brown and are now showing a dark black/brown mold. Pics to follow. 

I don't want to cut it back too harshly this time of year but also don't want it to die. 

Any advice? 


Posts

  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 6,144
    Not unusual in my experience.
    Do nothing now.
    In early Spring, I would coppice to about 6 inches, it will easily put on at least 5 foot of growth in a season.
    If you want me You can find me
    Left of center Off of the strip
    In the outskirts In the fringes In the corner
  • lordbaselordbase Posts: 5

  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 6,144
    That looks much worse than I thought it would.
    A lot of that is dead. Best course of action is probably still as I advised above.
    If you want me You can find me
    Left of center Off of the strip
    In the outskirts In the fringes In the corner
  • lordbaselordbase Posts: 5
    That's great, thanks for your help punkdoc. I'll leave it till spring and hope for the best! 
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 3,812
    I'd suggest removing the black bag.
    It's a lovely place for all sorts of nasites to hide over winter.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • lordbaselordbase Posts: 5
    Thanks will do, the browning and mold issue had started before I put that on and it was supposed to provide protection from Frost (its a thin plant fleece), but I think the plant probably has bigger issues! 
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 3,812
    It'll likely bounce back in the spring, and as punkdoc says, prune it hard in the spring when you can see what's dead and what's still alive.
    It's unlikely to need frost protection, but it's the pot (roots) that need cover, not the stem.
    Good luck!
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • lordbaselordbase Posts: 5
    Thanks again Pete - clearly I need to sit down and have a long chat with my mother about how this gardening stuff works! 
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 3,812
    :)
    Lots of help and advice available here too
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 10,708
    lordbase said:
    Thanks again Pete - clearly I need to sit down and have a long chat with my mother about how this gardening stuff works! 
    Quite a few of us are mothers as well so if there’s anything else you want to discuss 😀😀😀😀
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 
    Freedom’s just another word for nothing left to lose. 
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