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Training to climb

Hi Can anyone take a look at the pictures and tell me what you think the best way would be to get each of them growing up the wall behind? I'm not sure if it would just simple wire to hold them against the wall or some kind of wooden trellis?

First two pictures are of the same plant.

Thanks


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  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 19,859
    What type of rose is it,  if it’s a climber or rambler they need tying in horizontally not just left to grow up, so yes, you’re right they need a trellis or at least some strong wires fixed horizontally on the wall.
    what is the first plant? 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Lyn said:
    What type of rose is it,  if it’s a climber or rambler they need tying in horizontally not just left to grow up, so yes, you’re right they need a trellis or at least some strong wires fixed horizontally on the wall.
    what is the first plant? 
    Hi Lyn

    Not sure on the rose sorry. The problem is with the rose is that its been planted about 2 feet away from the wall rather directly underneath where the trellis would start. Does that matter? We think the other one is a honeysuckle but not 100% sure.
  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 4,628
    A rose planted two feet from a wall, it is not a problem to train it back into the wall. If it's a climber or rambler.

    I think you are right, the other plant looks like a Honeysuckle, but not able to see closer to be sure which, but it looks like Japonica if you have very whippy growth at the ends. Again, you can train those on wires or a trellis. They have a tendency to bush out if you don't do that, which is probably what's happened here. You can prune the front growth back in early spring. 
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 19,859
    As borderline says, that’s a good distance from the wall for the rose, they mustn’t be close to the wall or they won’t get any rain water, and the bricks will soak up the water, you can just push  it back to the trellis, 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Great advice as always. Thanks guys
  • Might be a bit harder to tell but on both pictures there is a very low level hedge. Just over 1ft tall.

    The owners of the garden have asked me to try and make it grow as it doesn't seem to have done much so far. I was going to post it as a separate conversation in spring with better pictures but as its on these have you got any growing advice?

    Thanks 
  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 4,628
    edited December 2018
    You will need to dig a border into the area for both plants and incorporate lots of well rotted manure or compost.

    Both plants are possibly suffering from all that grass growing around it and the soil possibly quite heavy and undisturbed, therefore roots are possibly restricted and failing to thrive. 
  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 SomersetPosts: 9,216
    The low level hedge looks like a dwarf box hedge from what I can see on the photo and 1ft or so, is the usual height to keep it clipped, although you can grow it higher if they wish. Box is very greedy so a good dollop of horse manure or chicken pellets should improve the growth rate.
  • Lizzie27 said:
    The low level hedge looks like a dwarf box hedge from what I can see on the photo and 1ft or so, is the usual height to keep it clipped, although you can grow it higher if they wish. Box is very greedy so a good dollop of horse manure or chicken pellets should improve the growth rate.
    Thanks Lizzie.

    The hedge is fairly new to the property I believe and I think they were hoping to grow it up to waist height. Maybe 3-4 feet? Do you think that will be possible over time?

    Thanks
  • MarlorenaMarlorena East AngliaPosts: 6,307
    Just out of curiosity, what is the name of the rose please?  there's a label at the base, thanks..
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