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Can anybody ID this Eucalyptus Gunni

jamesharcourtjamesharcourt West SussexPosts: 465
Not sure on the variety and mature size info.

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  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 11,173
    E.gunii is the species, there are no varieties.
    It will grow to 100 feet, if you let it.
    I have several, that I keep as shrubs, by coppicing in early Spring.
    He calls her the chocolate girl
    Cause he thinks she melts when he touches her
    She knows she's the chocolate girl
    Cause she's broken up and swallowed
    And wrapped in bits of silver
  • MarlorenaMarlorena East AngliaPosts: 6,306
    I think the member has answered his own question... although there are varieties available now, 2 dwarf ones called 'French Blue' and 'Azura'... but both are rather expensive, and unlikely to be in the above photos... but they could be...
  • jamesharcourtjamesharcourt West SussexPosts: 465
    Ok thanks, this one wasn’t so expensive but looked totally different to the other ones that were marked as Azura.  This is bushier and the leaves seemed smaller.
  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 11,173
    The leaves are always smaller, when they are juvenile.
    If you coppice them, they will always have small leaves.
    He calls her the chocolate girl
    Cause he thinks she melts when he touches her
    She knows she's the chocolate girl
    Cause she's broken up and swallowed
    And wrapped in bits of silver
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 19,859
    I bought this one to commemorate my daughter’s 13th. birthday, this was it 15 years later.

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • jamesharcourtjamesharcourt West SussexPosts: 465
    Lyn said:
    I bought this one to commemorate my daughter’s 13th. birthday, this was it 15 years later.

    Wow.  I’m putting this one into a relatively small space!  Can they just be trimmed to size a couple of times a year?
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,490
    edited December 2018
    I bought a gunnii best part of 30 years ago for £1.99
    Fast forward about 20 years - 


    The photo was taken in 2009
    It then cost £1100 to have it taken down and I still have a 5ft diameter trunk at soil level.

    So yes definitely keep it hard pruned.
    That will also keep the attractive young foliage rather than the pointy adult foliage.

    PS - I see you treated yourself to a pittosporum too
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,025
      This is bushier and the leaves seemed smaller.
    Don't let it fool you , James  ;)
    Those things have a mission to take over the world   :D
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • MarlorenaMarlorena East AngliaPosts: 6,306
    With the dwarfing varieties there's no need to have a tree like that today... these are a welcome change..
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,025
    I'd guess world domination is part of the reason, Del  ;)
    Pete's in Essex, so I'd also guess dry ground is an issue, along with the inevitable shade. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


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