Sheep

How often would you be prepared to usher a Sheep ( or 2 or 3 ) back into their field when they get on to a road ?Well, it's a lane really.

Given that the owner is aware of the poor fencing and appears not to worry too much.

Would you  ( endlessly ) shepherd  it back into the field with its pals and hope for the best.
Would  you try and point out to the owner that the fencing is either non existent or simply crap.
Would you persuade the recalcitrant sheep to mix with others in another field and therefore confuse the owner in the hope that they may eventually get the message. :D 



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Posts

  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 2,802
    It's not so bad at this time of year, but from April until June, when the lambs are still young, it's every day here. They can just walk under the gate, it fits so badly. The sheep don't bother. It's a bogging nuisance - you have to allow at least 10 minutes each car journey for sheep herding and I can't walk along the lane at that time of the year with dogs. All the farmers just sort through their sheep now and then and give each other's back because they are habitually wandering into each other's fields. It's even more fun when the cattle get into the sheep fields  :o
    Goodness is about what you do. Not what you pray to
    Sir Terry Pratchett
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 14,142
    Are they moving from paddock to road or paddock to your garden?

    If the former, call the police and ask them to return lost property which is a danger to traffic on the road.   I did that to great effect one night as I came home from a formal dinner in my posh frock and found half a dozen cows had escaped from their field way over behind us, crossed a stream and munched their way across a field of sugar beet and ended up in the road by our house.  Quite amusing but I wasn't prepared to try and round up 6 cows in the dark in my posh frock and a pair of wellies.

    If the latter, put them in with the ones that are in a secure field and let the owner stew.

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICTPosts: 12,950
    edited 28 November
    We have exactly this problem, Philippa, most years. The worst offenders are Herdwicks. But they have given us a lot of entertainment over the years.... Until they begin to eat the contents of my window boxes.

    The field is rented out to different farmers for different periods of time. Sometimes sheep, sometimes cows. Some bother to “fix” the fence, some leave it lying flat on the ground. Some care about their animals, some appear not to care that much.

    Whenever I see a new lot of sheep arriving, I go out and see if I know the owner.  If not, I begin to chat to the person delivering them, point out that rustling is a constant problem (it is, one flock got butchered right in the field) and ask the farmer for his mobile number so that I can alert him to any threats to his livestock. 

    They always give me a number. Then, when the sheep get out onto the lane, I just give them a call and tell them that their animals are in danger of being run over (true, the speed limit on the lane is the national speed limit).

    They come out soon enough and get them back in.
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 22,474
    I've done it on a few occasions. One in particular I called into the farm further down the road just to let them know as the fence was b*ggered and they would have got out again. Farmers tend to be a bit complacent about them though. If sheep want in/out, they get in/out. 
    The ones on hills are amusing though. I rather like that they still wander around the roads even when they have hundreds of acres to fanny about on  :D

    There's a gypsy down on Bleecker Street
    I went in to see her as a kind of joke
    And she lit a candle for my love luck
    And eighteen bucks went up in smoke

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 14,142
    Love the way sheep wander around the fells and dales in the Lakes but people do expect to see sheep about up there.  Not so much in less remote rural settings where there are fields with fences and walls and fast moving traffic.  

    I had th enumbers for teh cows next door and for the cows and horses opposite but not for this lot that came from way over the back.  Still have no idea whose they were.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • philippa smith2philippa smith2 Posts: 6,355
    I should point out that I m only a temporary guardian as such as I have nowt better to do at the moment. 

    My only "herding" experience has been with Chickens ( arms outspread which usually works a treat ) and Tortoises - same as above but takes a lot longer.

    This pm a Sheep popped out of the field and gazed longingly thru the garden gate.  I went and had a word with it, pointed out that its mates were missing it and it duly went back into the field.

    No doubt it will do exactly the same in the morning.........."Hi Philippa - want a chat ? "


  • BerghillBerghill Posts: 3,006
    The dozy beggars here get their heads stuck in the wire fencing. Now that is fun trying to free them,when they are so frightened they struggle. Otherwise as long as they cannot get on to our property I am sorry to say that we just let them wander away.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 22,474
     

    No doubt it will do exactly the same in the morning.........."Hi Philippa - want a chat ? "


    I love a chat with the sheep I meet.
     
    This one was even pointing the way. Just in case I missed the glen road...100 feet away
     :D 

    There's a gypsy down on Bleecker Street
    I went in to see her as a kind of joke
    And she lit a candle for my love luck
    And eighteen bucks went up in smoke

  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 2,802
    Obelixx said:
    Are they moving from paddock to road or paddock to your garden?

    If the former, call the police and ask them to return lost property which is a danger to traffic on the road.  

    I think I saw a police car here once, just before Christmas about 8 years ago. It was parked just up the road from the pub in the village, stopping people and breathalysing them. I think if I rang our local constabulary and said there were sheep in the road they'd say something like '....and?'. There are always sheep in the road. I know both the local farmers very well but even if I rang them and even if they came out, the sheep would be out again 20 minutes later. We generally try to go round them or herd them into the nearest gate if they are running too far from home. The farmers will find them eventually.

    Goodness is about what you do. Not what you pray to
    Sir Terry Pratchett
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICTPosts: 12,950
    I suppose quite a lot has to do with how rural your sheep are. And how rural your usual drivers are.

    The sheep in the field here ( or sometimes not in the field here) are virtually suburban sheep.

    The fields are surrounded by houses and many of the drivers are urban visitors who don’t expect to find a large ruminant standing in the middle of the road as they round a bend at 50mph.
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
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