Can someone identify my tree?

Hi, I was wondering if someone could help me identify the tree I have in my front garden? I moved into my house a year ago but the previous owners didn't know the species of tree. After doing a bit of research I thought it was a blue atlas cedar but now I don't think it is. It has bluey green looking needles and grew vertical candles about 100 - 150mm long in the summer which dried out and dropped to the ground. I've attached some photos to look at. Any help will be appreciated. Rich. 

Posts

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 15,541
    edited November 2018
    Maybe a blue form of abies koreana?

    Whatever it is it looks like it could do witha  good feed and a mulch to perk it up.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • RichloweryRichlowery Posts: 3
    Obelixx said:
    Maybe a blue form of abies koreana?

    Whatever it is it looks like it could do witha  good feed and a mulch to perk it up.
    Thanks Obelixx,

    I can see the similarities when looking up Koreana online. 

    Could you please expand on how to perk my tree up as I'm new to gardening? The bottom branches of the tree look worse than the rest as when we bought the house the garden had been overgrown with shrubbery for years. I guess the bottom branches were suffocated / rotted away. Thanks
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 15,541
    I would take off the lowest, tattiest branches using a pruning saw and cutting close to the trunk.  Remove any obvioulsy broken or diseased branches higher up but be careful about shaping.    Then get it under it with a rake or cultivator to loosen up the soil and then, after a good rain, pile on a bag of ericaceous compost and rake it level.  It needs to be a couple of inches thick.   Do this as soon as you can and the worms will work it all in for you over winter.

    Come spring, give it a couple of handfls of pelleted chicken manure or blood fish and bone scattered under the canopy.

    You can buy these products in good DIY stores and garden centres.  If you don't already have tools, look at the Wolf system as this allows you to by a set of heads for each new job as they arise along with handles in varying lengths so hand, waist high and long.  Their range includes a pruning saw, rake, assorted hoes, a cultivator so you can bu them as need and budget allow.  I find them very good and hard-wearing - https://www.worldofwolf.co.uk/categories/multi-change-tools?gclid=CjwKCAiAlvnfBRA1EiwAVOEgfMrZnEq4gfNyOxShLkDKuWbWMDeNcPw2r1K-5lWnk2ze9QLsVA4L0RoCj1cQAvD_BwE
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • RichloweryRichlowery Posts: 3
    Obelixx said:
    I would take off the lowest, tattiest branches using a pruning saw and cutting close to the trunk.  Remove any obvioulsy broken or diseased branches higher up but be careful about shaping.    Then get it under it with a rake or cultivator to loosen up the soil and then, after a good rain, pile on a bag of ericaceous compost and rake it level.  It needs to be a couple of inches thick.   Do this as soon as you can and the worms will work it all in for you over winter.

    Come spring, give it a couple of handfls of pelleted chicken manure or blood fish and bone scattered under the canopy.

    You can buy these products in good DIY stores and garden centres.  If you don't already have tools, look at the Wolf system as this allows you to by a set of heads for each new job as they arise along with handles in varying lengths so hand, waist high and long.  Their range includes a pruning saw, rake, assorted hoes, a cultivator so you can bu them as need and budget allow.  I find them very good and hard-wearing - https://www.worldofwolf.co.uk/categories/multi-change-tools?gclid=CjwKCAiAlvnfBRA1EiwAVOEgfMrZnEq4gfNyOxShLkDKuWbWMDeNcPw2r1K-5lWnk2ze9QLsVA4L0RoCj1cQAvD_BwE
    Thank you very much for the advice. I'll get my gloves and boots on this weekend and give it a go. 
  • MarlorenaMarlorena Posts: 1,529
    edited November 2018
    I would ask, do you really want to keep it?... it's only going to get bigger, and bigger and bigger... it's close to a path, there is a cable above it that looks like it won't be long before they get in each others way...  eventually it's going to have to be removed I would think...  a nice idea at the time, when planted young, but conifers like these are really only suitable for very large gardens and park like settings..

    Sorry, I know this is not a happy suggestion... and you only asked for the i.d. of it..  but best of luck with whatever you do... nice front garden...
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 15,541
    That is a good point Marlorena but a lot depends on how far away it is from the house and how much light it will block.   I love the blue foliage and would happily have one in my garden, just not close to the house.   
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
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