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Mycorrhizal Fungi - is there any difference between brands?

NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen Spain.Posts: 5,023
So I need to get some for new bare root roses, so far I have used David Austin’s MF plus their Rose Feed. There are cheaper brands of MF out there, are they any good or should I stick with DA? 
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  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 18,626
    edited November 2018
    In nature, these microscopic fungi run throughout the soil and assist plants in taking up vital nutrients.

    I suppose, different plants, growing naturally, would be assisted more by one type of fungus than another. They would probably form a relationship with particularly helpful fungi, in the wild.

    When you buy a commercial version of such fungi I would think that respectable sellers would be offering the best and most helpful types of fungus. Ones that would, in nature, be doing that job.

    Any microscopic fungus could be termed mycorrhizal but whether or not one, that naturally had a relationship with a tree say,  would help a rose to grow well I can’t say.
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 8,237
    I have used various brands and can't say l have noticed any different results between them. You pay your money and take your choice !
  • NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen Spain.Posts: 5,023
    Interesting, I hadn’t thought of different fungi forming different relationships with different plants. I wonder if that means it’s probably better to buy a rose grower’s MF mix for roses or if there is no difference really. I guess its difficult to compare brands unless you had several identical plants and tried a different brand on each, but even then it could be down to other factors or just plain chance.
  • jamesharcourtjamesharcourt West SussexPosts: 463
    I've used the "Empathy" stuff you can get in Wilko and whilst it's hard to actually know the effect without having a parallel planting without and then uprooting and measuring root mass ... I did notice a lot of root growth in the things that I did move a few months after planting.  

    I also bought a big 5KG tub of "Root Grow" as well but it's too early to see the results yet really.
  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 9,735
    I have to admit to finding this very strange.
    There is as yet no scientific evidence, that powdered fungi work at all.
    Why would they? They are powdered, are they even alive?
    Southern trees bear a strange fruit
    Blood on the leaves and blood at the root
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 18,626
    You old cynic you.

    Here is a very interesting website with lots of information on different pages. It explains that these fungi fall into two groups. Some live inside the plant and some live in the soil. It explains that different types do have different host plants.

    They are collected for sale in the form of spores, which could be dried I imagine, by ground-up hyphae and by some other method, which I forget.

    Here is one page which describes a product that they offer and the types of fungi that it contains. Other mixes are available for other situations.


    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • tessagardenbarmytessagardenbarmy York,North YorkshirePosts: 346
    I'm a bit skeptical  about all these powders if you've  got  a good well nourished soil with plenty of organic matter,"magic muck" etc. I'm sure  the fungi will be there in the soil ready?
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 71,827
    I also think that if your soil is good with lots of organic matter that's been there a goodly while then adding mycorrhizal fungi may not be necessary ... but in new build gardens or poor sandy/gritty soil or  heavy clay I'm convinced by the arguments I've read that they can be beneficial. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 9,735
    I am certain, that fungi are essential, just very sceptical about packets of white powder, masquerading as fungi, being beneficial.
    Southern trees bear a strange fruit
    Blood on the leaves and blood at the root
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 71,827
    edited November 2018
    From what I've seen, it bears a remarkable resemblance to the packaged dried mycelium(?) labelled mushroom spawn that Ma used to spread on beds of horse manure in a shed to grow mushrooms for sale at the farm gate back in the late 50s early 60s. 
    :)
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







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