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October sown peas in pots

Following Monty Don's advice in either the last, or last but one, episode of GW this year, I sowed 2 dozen 3 inch pots with peas "Meteor" at three seeds per pot in the unheated greenhouse at my allotment. Here we are in mid- November and every one has germinated. All about an inch high  with some roots already out of the pots and into the gravel. Now I can find no reference anywhere on t'internet as to when to plant them out. Monty didn't say in the TV episode either. If I keep them in the greenhouse they are clearly going to outgrow the pots well before Spring. Any suggestions?

Posts

  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 5,043
    I usually pinch out the tips and pot them on into bigger pots then keep them in the GH until the weather shows some signs of improving (late Feb here, generally, although that didn't work last year). They are cold hardy and they will 'stand' if you plant them out, especially with some protection such as a cloche. The only reason I don't do this is because they end up being the tastiest tender sprouts at soil level in the veg garden in January/February and every creature for miles comes in to eat the poor things. So it depends how high your slug/mouse/vole/rat/pigeon/pheasant population is whether you keep them in or put them out.

    The rate of growth will slow and then stop as the weather gets colder so, most years, you don't have to keep potting them on.
    “There is no military solution
    Doesn't always end up as something worse”
  • Thanks, Raisingirl. Exactly the advice I needed. Going to experiment. Will hope for a mild spell before Christmas and plant half out under a fleece tunnel. The other half will stay in the greenhouse and be potted on / pinched out as necessary, aiming to get them out  early March. I'm on an urban allotment site in Leeds. The Pennines protect us from the West ( though not the "Beast from the East) so I'm hopeful. November down broad beans usually do OK without protection.
  • Allotment BoyAllotment Boy North London Posts: 4,528
    I find Peas are not as hardy as the broad Beans even in milder years so good luck with your experiment it will be good to hear the outcome.
    AB Still learning

  • Zoomer44Zoomer44 Posts: 3,212
    Do let us know how they get on. I'm in Lancashire and am growing broad beans this side of December this year for the first time. I have them in pots in the GH but may have sown them a little early in Oct as they are about 10 inches high and I'm not sure they'll get through the winter. 

    I'm all for experimenting, I'm trying to over winter some chilli plants to get a head start next year. They aren't looking brilliant but the leaves are still green and healthy.  

       
  • Steve KindSteve Kind Posts: 6
    edited November 2018
    Zoomer44 said:
    Do let us know how they get on. I'm in Lancashire and am growing broad beans this side of December this year for the first time. I have them in pots in the GH but may have sown them a little early in Oct as they are about 10 inches high and I'm not sure they'll get through the winter. 

    I'm all for experimenting, I'm trying to over winter some chilli plants to get a head start next year. They aren't looking brilliant but the leaves are still green and healthy.  

       
    What variety , Zoomer? If they are Aquadulce or another winter-hardy variety, I'd suggest you harden them off and get them outside , under cloche or fleece protection if you can. Also, pinch the tips out to encourage them to bush. I've overwintered broad beans outside on a quite exposed allotment site here in Leeds for the last three years successfully. If you leave them in the greenhouse they will grow way too fast. If you have enough, keep a few back to replace losses, or put them all out and sow more in the greenhouse in February, again for replacements.
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