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Raspberries - totally confused and utterly ignorant

B3B3 Posts: 27,331
I bought one raspberry plant last year. It has one stem that looks like along bramble stem. Is that what you call a cane?
Do I chop it off or just prune it?
In London. Keen but lazy.
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  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 30,017
    It depends on whether it's early or late fruiting.   Earlies fruit on new canes produced the previous year and you then cut these back to the base once you've harvested the fruit, thus leaving space for the new canes to grow and be tied in for the next year's crop.

    Laters fruit on new canes produced that year so get cut down in late winter to allow space for the new canes to grow.

    Do you know the variety?  That would identify which it is and how to treat it.


    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • B3B3 Posts: 27,331
    No. I'm sorry I haven't a clue about the variety and what is a cane? When I think of canes, I think of bamboo sticks. I haven't seen anything that looks like a stick.
    I told you I was ignorant :/
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 87,904
    edited November 2018
    The long stalk with prickles is a raspberry cane :)  Now you now more about raspberries than you did yesterday ;)

    Can you remember what time of year you bought it?

    Is it just straight up and down or are there any little side branches?

    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 30,017
    Cane is just a word for a fruiting stem.  Blackberries have canes too as do Tayberrries, Loganberries and the rest of that family of fruiting plants.
    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • B3B3 Posts: 27,331
    Thanks, both. I am indeed a bit less ignorant now! It's just one long, long stem.
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 30,017
    Did it fruit this year?  Was it newly planted last year?  Then leave it be, feed it in spring and you should get some fruits on that stem and new canes coming up to increase teh crop the following year.   Keep its space weeded, mulched and watered as they don't like to dry out - one of the reasons they do so well in Scotland.

    See here for more info - https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/grow-your-own/fruit/raspberries

    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • raisingirlraisingirl Posts: 7,080
    If you cut it down, you could kill it (unlikely, they're tough plants). If you don't cut it you won't kill it but it may give you less fruit next season. So on balance, I'd leave it and try to remember to notice if that old cane has fruit on it next year.
    Gardening on the edge of Exmoor, in Devon

    “It's still magic even if you know how it's done.” 
  • B3B3 Posts: 27,331
    No fruit this year. I left it in the pot for a year before I got round to planting it.  If I let the stem run along the ground, will it root?
    Thanks for the link. I'll have a look😊
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • It sounds to me as if it's a summer fruiting variety and that cane should bear fruit next year 2019.
    Tie it to a support so it doesn't bash about in the winter winds and as others have said keep the area clear of weeds, watered in dry spells and mulched ... next year you should get several new canes which will bear fruit in 2020 ... so after the current cane has fruited you can cut it down to the ground and look after the new ones :)

    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • B3B3 Posts: 27,331
    I'll tie it to the fence. Thanks Dove.
    In London. Keen but lazy.
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