Forum home Tools and techniques

propagating cuttings via hydroponics over winter

Hi, I'm trying to propagate some perennials from cuttings just taken, using hydroponics and grow lights.

I'd like some advice of the feasibility of this experiment please!

Pictured below is my propagation unit with the cuttings; the lights are on 15 hours a day and the fertilizer in the water is apparently NPK 5-3-8 with micronutrients. The cuttings are sitting in about a centimeter of water, surrounded by porous sterile stone, soaked by capillary action.

(you can see a video of how the system works here:

My hope is that the roots take,  I can pot the plants on, sun under the grow lights for a while, then store in the conservatory over the remainder of winter.

The plants in this picture are from front: nepeta, salvia, hydrangea.

Has anyone tried this method with success, or have any advice to offer?

Thanks!
Phil.






Posts

  • Salvia and Nepeta root so easily in just a pot of gritty compost. I've got some Nepeta I did a month or so ago and will do Salvias in the spring. Don't need any expensive equipment.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 65,359
    I root hydrangea in a jam jar of water on the kitchen windowsill. Usually get close to 100% success rate. 
    As has been said, salvia and nepeta cuttings root in grttty compost in a coldframe or kitchen windowsill too then overwinter them and the hydrangeas in a coldframe. 
    I would worry about encouraging over-soft growth if the overwintered in too sheltered conditions. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 16,762
    edited November 2018
    Nice add for Ikea.!
    Most plants root easily in gritty compost or glass of water on a window sill.
    Dont go into thinking that has an advantage, unless you’re growing tropical/specialised plants. 
    Even if they grow on quicker, you still can’t plant them out until all frosts have past. 

    I have 60 hydrangeas here, all grown from cuttings. 

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Kitty 2Kitty 2 ManchesterPosts: 5,150
    Any top tips please @Lyn. My mum has asked me to root a cutting from my white mophead. I've never tried hydrangeas before.
    I have watched a couple of YouTube vids, but they don't say when to take them. 
  • Thanks for your responses, I'm hopeful that the cuttings will take.
    I should have clarified, but what I'm hoping is that I can establish a decent root system in these plants over winter, with the help of the lamps - set them aside for a month or two, then have plants for spring that would be bigger than via normal propagation.

    I'll keep you updated!
    Thanks
    Phil
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 5,519
    Lyn said:
    Nice add for Ikea.!
    Most plants root easily in gritty compost or glass of water on a window sill.
    Dont go into thinking that has an advantage, unless you’re growing tropical/specialised plants. 
    Even if they grow on quicker, you still can’t plant them out until all frosts have past. 

    I think the Ikea system is probably aimed at people who live in flats with only one or 2 windows and no garden. I just feel bad for anyone whose only way to grow things is under lights like that using shop bought liquid feeds.

    Saying that it's been so dark for the last week or so that I've been contemplating buying a couple of grow lights for indoor plants that are starting to look leggy.
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 16,762
    This time of the year is most plants sleep time, you can’t replicate Summer all year round, or can you, I don’t know.

    I take them any time from late Spring to late summer, must admit I have never taken them this time of the year.
    i just cut bits off about 8” tall, strip of lower leaves leave a few on the top but cut then diagonally. Push well down round the edge of a flower pot then put a stick in the middle and a food bag over to seal. 
    The new growth will come from the base, from the soil, removthe bag as soon as you see the shooting.  Take several when you’re learning, you’re bound to get one or two. 

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Kitty 2Kitty 2 ManchesterPosts: 5,150
    Thanks Lyn👍. Using new shoots in spring/summer sounds good to me.
Sign In or Register to comment.