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Is This What I Think It Is

Can someone identify this fungus. I noticed a few toadstools yesterday but overnight it has really taken a hold.

We had a Mountain Ash in the bed which died over winter, I didn't think to much about it as it was an old tree but now I'm worried it died because of Honey Fungus. 

Any help would be gratefully received.


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Posts

  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 9,672
    I don't think it's honey fungus Jane, but l am no expert. I think honey fungus mushrooms are quite slim, a bit like thick plates if that makes sense. 
  • SkandiSkandi Northern DenmarkPosts: 1,454
    It looks like Armillaria cepistipes to me Very closely related to honey fungus, I do not know if it causes the same issues.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,628
    This link to infor from the RHS says it's one of the honey fungus family and yes, it probably did see off your sorbus.  It ahs quite a few pants on its hit list - https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=180

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 9,672
    Thanks for that link @Obelixx , l have learnt something. What a shame about Jane's tree.
  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 SomersetPosts: 9,271
    That was an interesting link Obelixx - thanks.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,628
    The RHS website is full of lovely info for gardeners.  Not infallible but my first port of call for confirming an ID or cultivation needs etc...
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Thanks for all your comments. I had already looked at RHS site but still wasn't sure. The problem doesn't seem any worse today but I think I'll take the cautious root and try to isolate the area. Pity really I had such great plans for that area, still waiting a year would probably be the sensible thing to do.
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,336
    edited November 2018
    I'd agree that it's one of the Honey Fungus family.  It needs a 'home base' of rotting wood to mature in (often a tree stump but any wood in contact with the ground will do) before it sends out the deadly 'boot laces' which infect living woody plants.  The fruiting bodies can appear anywhere but are often in lines following infected tree roots (those of a huge Ash tree in my case.)  If the clump in the background is growing on the infected roots of something, I would dig those roots out as well as all of the log edging from the area before digging it over deeply, removing any rhizomorphs as you go.  This should at least slow it down in a big way (regular soil cultivation is often recommended for infected areas.)  You could then plant resistent species straightaway in my experience, or grow annuals in the area for a season or two and keep turning the soil over as regularly as you can.  It's been a couple or more years since I lost anything (but expect it back eventually.)
    As well as the RHS site, there is also some excellent info. and lists of both susceptible and resistent trees, plants and shrubs in this pdf from the Guernsey government website:

    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • Thanks for your comments Bob. You seem to have had experience of this problem. Today I have found a clump shooting up in the greenhouse which has a gravel floor, is this possible or is it more likely to be something other than the dreaded Honey Fungus.
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,336
    I've had it appear in the greenhouse too, in my case through pea shingle.  I know there's one of the Ash tree roots running under there though, so you may have similar if you have any trees nearby (ie within about 20m or so.)   I often see them appear at the edges where soil meets something else like a path so wonder if they appear where a rhizome meets something it doesn't like, sort of a last gasp bid to procreate?
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
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