Novice

Hi, I am an absolute novice to gardening and have a small (and I'm sure simple) question if anybody could help Me? I want to plant maybe a small tree in the corner of our garden, but was wondering that at this time of year (about to be the start of November) would it be able to survive through the winter and grow, or are conditions too harsh at this time? Also any ideas on what the best type of tree/shrub would be to plant in a small corner of a garden at this time of year?? Any information would be helpful, Thanks.

Posts

  • Allotment BoyAllotment Boy North London Posts: 1,827
    Although we have had some air frosts already the soil will still be warm enough for roots to grow. It is often recommended to plant bare rooted trees & shrubs at this time of year so they can begin to establish their roots without the strain of trying to maintain a top canopy. It does depend a little on your location and conditions but it should be fine.
    AB Still learning

  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 3,805
    edited October 2018
    @kieran.betts I always suggest an amelanchier for a small garden.  Blossom in the Spring, followed by berries and good autumn colour. You have come to the right place for advice !
  • Personal choice but I would be looking to plant a small crabapple,lovely blossom and the birds love to eat the fruit in the autumn/winter.
  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Bath, SomersetPosts: 3,157
    I second the Amelanchier, a good choice for a small garden.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 53,217
    edited November 2018

    We planted this multi-stemmed amelanchier in our smallish garden two years ago last May ... in the spring it's covered with blossom, then it has berries which the birds love, and now, in the autumn, the leaf colour is wonderful .... you can't go wrong with an amelanchier. :D
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 23,677
    I'd echo Dove - you can't go wrong with Amelanchier lamarkii. Technically it's a shrub, but most people grow it as a multi stemmed specimen [as above] or you can remove lower branches and make it more 'tree-like' with a main trunk.
    Anything in a pot can be planted at any time, as long as the ground isn't frozen or waterlogged. Prep the hole well, with plenty of extra compost and/or well rotted manure, make sure it has a clear area around it to prevent competition for water and nutrients from other plants or grass, and water in well after planting.
    If the ground isn't terribly well cultivated where you want to plant it, make the hole a good bit bigger than the pot, so that you can incorporate the compost/manure into some of the existing soil for backfilling. Plant at the same level as it is in the pot, and firm in. It may need a stake too. A mulch of more compost or bark after planting is also beneficial. 
    The advantage of that type of tree is that you can also have spring bulbs under them to give you a really nice feature, and extend the interest even more.  :)
    And somewhere on the hill
    Inside the past we hear the bells
    Catching only parts of thoughts
    And fragments of ourselves
    Till we begin
    Again


  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 53,217
    edited November 2018
    The great thing about it being multistemmed is that if you want to control its size you can just take one or two stems out from the base ... new ones will grow in time but that way you can keep it smaller without chopping branches off and spoiling the beautiful elegant shape. 
    As Fairy says, we have blue scillas and Glory of the Snow flowering underneath it in the spring, and in the autumn there are pink Cyclamen hederafolium developing into a little carpet around it. 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 23,677
    It's a great plant altogether  :)
    We had a couple at the last house, along a fence which enclosed a little 'courtyard' area. It was always covered in insects when the blossom was out, and the birds enjoyed the berries later. From the patio area on the other side of the fence, we could admire all of it whatever the season  :)

    This is the only pic  I have - showing the lovley bronzy colour of the foliage

    And somewhere on the hill
    Inside the past we hear the bells
    Catching only parts of thoughts
    And fragments of ourselves
    Till we begin
    Again


  • Hi guys, thank you for all of your wonderful advice and lovely pictures. I will certainly be looking into planting an Amelanchier, they look beautiful. Somebody had also recommended to me a 'Mountain Ash' I believe but I think it may be a bit too big for what I'm looking for. Trying to sort my mother's garden out and taking it step by step and learning 'on the job' at the moment 😅. But she asked for a small tree or shrub in that corner specifically as a remembrance piece for a much loved family pet, so that shall be the first job to be undertook. Many Thanks everybody.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 23,677
    Sorbus [mountain ash] do get big, but they have light canopies, and they take a  good while to get to a large size, assuming you aren't forking out hundreds of pounds for a mature specimen. They're excellent trees for smaller plots.
    There are named varieties - many with different coloured berries - but I personally prefer our native one, Sorbus aucuparia   :)
    And somewhere on the hill
    Inside the past we hear the bells
    Catching only parts of thoughts
    And fragments of ourselves
    Till we begin
    Again


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