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Moving Young Hedge

Hi

I am after some advice

I recently moved into a new build house and I am not happy with the position of the hedge. I want to move it to the boundary.

It is 6 months old so still very young.

Can I do this and what is the best method?

Thanks

Mike

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Posts

  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 5,555
    Welcome to the forum. :) Do you know what type of hedge it is ? How tall is it ? Whereabouts in the UK  are you? A photo may be of some help.
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,872
    edited October 2018
    It's odd that a hedge hasn't been planted close to the boundary ... how far from the boundary is it?  Hedges do widen as they grow and unless it is a 'shared boundary' they should be planted 'within' the property and not on the boundary line itself.  That way problems lie ahead re upkeep etc.  
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • edited October 2018


    Thanks for your responses

    This is the hedge, it is some kind of flowering privet.

    The bit on the road side of the garden is about 4 foot from the boundary as the developer put a flower bed, which I own, to the far side of it. Hedge is about a 2 foot or so high.

    I am in Knaresborough nr Harrogate in North Yorkshire.

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,872
    edited October 2018


    The bit on the road side of the garden is about 4 foot from the boundary as the developer put a flower bed, which I own, to the far side of it. Hedge is about a 2 foot or so high.


    That's very likely to ensure unobstructed vision for drivers leaving the driveway ... I would not alter it.   The 'visibility splay' has probably been allowed for in the planning. 

    Our neighbour opposite recently knocked a child off her bike as he left his drive as his vision was obscured by tall shrubs to the right of his driveway.  Fortunately she only suffered bruises and grazes and her mother was unbelievably forgiving.  
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • AnniDAnniD Posts: 5,555
    edited October 2018
    I agree with Dove, they have been planted to allow room for growth, and they should fill out pretty quickly. If you moved them closer to the drive/pavement, they would suffer due to the concrete footings put in for the edging, if you know what l mean. Someone has obviously thought this through ! It's good that they thought about the view when leaving the driveway, l wish they'd done the same on our estate. We have seen some near misses too.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 28,434
    I'd agree too. The footings can be a big issue for hedges, and they also need a bit of room to fill out without encroaching on the pavements and walkways, although it looks like you don't have pavements, but are directly onto the road? 
    It's also likely that Dove's right about the view when leaving the property. The lack of pavement is possibly a factor in that too. 
    It's a very good idea, but unfortunately, many estates won't have the room to take that into consideration. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • I had considered the fact that it might be to do with visibility coming off the drive. Just a shame that there is a big patch of land that it basically pointless as when the hedge grows we wont even see it never mind use it.

    Think I will write to the develop and get some info from them.

    May look to add a metal fence that you can see through instead maybe.
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 15,290

    Dont underestimate the growth of the hedging, in a couple of years it will be over the edge of the grass verge and you’ll need to cut it back.
    i don’t think I would say anything to the developers, it all looks very open plan, they may ask you to remove the roadside ones. 

    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • madpenguinmadpenguin Isle of WightPosts: 1,819
    Along the road edge of my property there is a 3ft strip which is not actually mine even though my lawn,the end of my driveway and a couple of flower beds utilise it.
    A lot of services are under it which I found to my cost when a lamp post was replaced and they dug up part of my lawn and a flower bed! They were quite within their rights to do this as technically the land is not mine.
    “Every day is ordinary, until it isn't.” - Bernard Cornwell-Death of Kings
  • I definitely own the bit between the hedge and the road as it is included in the coveyance plan. Problem is people think its communal due to it being outside what they perceive to be my boundary hedge.

    The house was newbuild so everything that is planted was done by the developer so they won’t ask me to remove anything but want to get their input into what I could and couldn’t do I think.
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