Help please!!! Boundary ideas...

robbie2redrobbie2red Brecon Posts: 37
edited October 2018 in Garden design
Hi again!

I’m trying to plan my boundary...

Along the left hand boundary we have a stone wall running along the bottom (about 2ft high), then the hedge is above it (our neighbours garden is slightly above ours). I want to get a border along it. Here’s how it is...



So in that “new border” I want to put lots of perennials, that’s not my problem.

However between the hedge and the stone wall is a “small border”, and this is my issue. The hedge is pretty much completely bare now. I want some more greenery, or interest through autumn/winter where the hedge is.

Could I put some pyracantha in that “small border”, and would it use the hedge for stability, and grow through it and in front of it??? Was also thinking the same for some climbers, would that use the hedge to climb??? I don’t fancy taking the hedge out and restarting (even if I could).

It’s a lovely sunny spot (gets the sun from midday till sunset), but the “small border” is only about 6” wide before the foot of the hedge.

I was originally thinking of just making the border wider at the same height as the top of the wall (slightly raised border), but thought it would be a real shame to fill against a lovely stone wall.

Thanks all! Would appreciate any ideas!!! Beginner here!!! Please be gentle! ;-)
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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 24,498
    I'm struggling to make sense of that drawing - sorry!
    Some photos would be helpful  :)
    Pyracantha will grow in small spaces though, as long as it's properly prepped and cared for after planting. There are varieties which are columnar, and therefore free standing. I have one in a tiny space at the end of my hedge in the front garden - it might be called Red Column or something similar.  I can't remember. It was a rescue, and I didn't think it would survive at all, so I forgot all about it. 
    In a tight space, you'd be eternally pruning most Pyracanthas though.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • robbie2redrobbie2red Brecon Posts: 37
    Oh, sorry @Fairygirl it’s meant to be a cross section of the left hand boundary of my garden. I’ll try and get a pic probably Sunday now as we’re off to Westonbirt Arboretum for the day tomorrow! :-)

    The “new border” is the level of our garden. 

    I want something really to act like a climber, but not sure if the pyracantha would do that!
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 24,498
    No - pyracantha isn't a climber in that sense.
    I think if it's that narrow a space, it's the usual  issue of competition for water and nutrients when you have a hedge there. Most climbers would struggle to get established in those conditions.
    Get your pic to give a better feel of the area, and then see if anyone can come up with better suggestions  :)
    Enjoy your day out. Whatever you do, don't bring home a big tree...  ;)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • robbie2redrobbie2red Brecon Posts: 37
    Enjoy your day out. Whatever you do, don't bring home a big tree...  ;)
    Haha @Fairygirl we could do with a few! 😉

    I’ve warned the wife already! 😂
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 3,076
    Fairygirl said:
    I'm struggling to make sense of that drawing - sorry!

    Are you just after something to give evergreen colour to the hedge or as under-planting as well? What is the hedge made up of and how often does it get cut?

  • tessagardenbarmytessagardenbarmy York,North YorkshirePosts: 328
    Something to grow through the hedge like an evergreen clematis  with a lower hedge of lavender or cotton lavender in front of it?
  • robbie2redrobbie2red Brecon Posts: 37
    Hi @wild edges and thank you! That’s brill!!! How’d you do that?! It’s spot on!!!

    I’m sorry but I’m not sure what it is. My dad cut it (I’m a wheelchair user) about 3 weeks ago and it’s mostly back to bare bones now. I think that’s the first time it’s been cut for a year or so (new house and it was on the market a fair time before we bought it). But I guess we’ll have to cut it several times a year...

    I just want to add colour really throughout autumn/winter, as the hedge will green up nice in the summer as a backdrop for the perennials. Ideally with some berries for the birds, but obviously I know that may not be possible.

    Thanks @tessagardenbarmy I like your ideas! Though I don’t think there’ll be enough room for the lavender in front of it. However in the Lower border in front of the wall I’d have lots of height with shrubs etc.

    Thank you both! Love the diagram! A little improvement on mine! 😂
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 24,498
    Ah - that's better w.edges. I couldn't work out where exactly the 6 inch border was!  ;)
    You could have cotoneaster there. It would do well enough in the circumstances, and would provide flowers/ berries for wildlife. The main issue though, would be access to prune the hedge. If you plant in front of it, that could be very difficult. There are certainly plenty of ground cover plants which wouldn't mind being trodden on though.

    A climber planted at one end could be useful, but getting it established will be tricky for the reasons I mentioned initially. It would also have to be only growing in winter, or the issue of hedge pruning arises again. Do you really need to have anything planted there at all?

    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 3,076
    Hi @wild edges and thank you! That’s brill!!! How’d you do that?! It’s spot on!!! 
    It's basically my job to turn sketches and descriptions into legible diagrams. You could say I've had a lot of practice. :#

    I've added holly into mature hedges in the past but you need to buy potted plants with a good height to them so they settle in well and can fight for leaf space. You can cut chunks out of the existing hedge to make room for them if the hedge species will allow that. I'd be tempted to go for a couple of native honeysuckles and rambling roses through there though. It'll give the berries but not winter leaves. It would leave you space for some nice alpines to fill the border and cascade over the wall though.
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 3,076
    I forgot to say, if you go for anything that might find it's way onto the neighbour's side then it might be best to agree it with them first. Pyrocantha isn't the most fun to maintain due to the spikes and they might not take kindly to being landed with the work.
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