Pear tree issue, or not?

In the image you see a third year Dixie Delight pear tree. An overhanging limb fell and broke the original main leader (at the arrow) at the end of last season.  As you see, a lower limb became dominant this year. It is now 6 ft long with no branches. Will the tree mature properly like this? Will this "new main leader" branch? Should I leave it alone, cut it, other? Thanks for any suggestions

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  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 58,518
    If it's anything like my young Concorde pear which I've trained as an espalier, I train a new branch upwards one year and it develops side branches in the following year.  I think yours will be ok.

    Good luck  :)
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 16,193
    I take it you are not in UK, as I have never heard of the Dixie Delight. But trees are trees the world over. 

    So far as your pear tree goes, it is doing what trees do. If you cast your eye over this article,

    http://www.plantsmanscorner.co.uk/journal-articles/961-how-to-train-a-stepover-three-steps-forward-one-step-back.html

    you will see something called apical dominance. This is what your tree is displaying. Whether it is a stepover tree or a more usual shape that you want to achieve,  the rules are the same.

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • The central leader is bare, 6 feet with no side branches. Topping it (and perhaps another of the longest branches) to motivate branching would be a bad idea?
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 16,193
    No, not a bad idea at all.
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
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