Staghorn Sumac in front garden?

Hi All, 

I saw one of these recently in all it’s autumnal glory and I think they are awesome. 
I have since read up on them and have realised they’re very hard to keep in check so probably not a good idea for my back garden sadly. 

This is my front garden - next doors is also paved over. Do you think it could work here? 

It’s south facing and I have to do something about the paving stones because they were lain so badly. 

Would you put under the tree? Should I put gravel around the rest of the front or do you have some better ideas? 

Thank you! 

A x 
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Posts

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 18,199
    There is a really lovely form of this plant with cut edged leaves called rhus typhinus dissecta.   Autumn is a great time to plant new trees and shrubs as they are dormant and thus put little demands on their roots which can then grow into their new home.  You will need to water it well before and after planting and thru any dry spells.  I suggest you leave the planting area unpaved so the tree hes a maximum amount of available rain.   You could mulch it with chipped bark or grow some ground cover plants to keep weeds down.

    You need to lift all those slabs and stack them - out of sight if you want to keep them - while you remove all weeds and then see what was underneath them.  If someone has laid hardcore it needs to come up in space at least 3' x 3' square so you can dig a hole and add soil improver and compost in which your tree can grow.   Then you can level the rest of the space and prepare it for re-laying the slabs, assuming that's what you want to do to make housing recycling bins easier.

    I'm no expert at this part so will leave others to advise you but I think you need to make sure the gaps between the slabs are permeable so that rain can drain away.  That will affect the materials you can use.


    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • steephillsteephill Posts: 964
    Check the likely height and spread of the canopy against the space you have available. Ours had a spread of at least 4 metres which would be too big for your front garden.
  • steephill said:
    Check the likely height and spread of the canopy against the space you have available. Ours had a spread of at least 4 metres which would be too big for your front garden.
    Obelixx supplied the answer in her reply! Rhus typhinus dissecta is gorgeous and has half the spread

    I hadn’t thought of re-laying the paving stones once I had put in the tree as I’m the end terrace so usually have the bins in my back garden. 
    Helpful to know about planting now as I hadn’t been able to find that info yet.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 18,199
    See my answer which explains about planting or have a look at this - https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/105810/Rhus-typhina-Dissecta/Details

    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Thanks Obelixx - apologies my wording was clumsy! I was thanking you for saying I can plant around now but thanks for the article also  <3
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 22,344
    Please factor in the effect a large plant has on windows/the room beyond.
    Devon.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 18,199
    Dissecta is really quite airy and also lower and less spreading than the usual form.  It will sucker if hapy tho so you'll need to be vigilant.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Hi there,
    Havent posted on the forum site for ages but like to have a read of the posts when i get chance.
    Anyway saw your post about sumach and highly recomend rhus "tigers eye" which is alot smaller and slow growing than the standard typhina. I have one in the front garden and one in the back. They are stunning at the moment, one has the candle like fruits growing on it. 
    Well worth the space for a tree for autumn
  • Oh and no suckering from it either. Though it may be due to the fact our garden is heavy clay? Ive got to say it deserves a place in the garden as its so well behaved x
  • Awesome - I might even get that in the back without it taking over! Thanks for the heads up 💕
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