Narrow hedging.

madpenguinmadpenguin Isle of WightPosts: 938
edited 11 October in Plants
Just been to my local Garden Centre and saw these shrubs (Eleagnus and Ligustrum) planted in large pots.It shows that with a good framework and training you could make a very narrow hedge or screen with ordinary shrubs directly in the ground.
Both shrubs were about 1ft deep.
Thought I would just show what can be done if you have the inclination!

Eleagnus


Ligustrum



“Every day is ordinary, until it isn't.” - Bernard Cornwell-Death of Kings

Posts

  • hogweedhogweed Central ScotlandPosts: 3,351
    I think they would be ok as a small screen but I don't think many people could or would, devote the necessary time to tying in and/or pruning almost every shoot for upwards of 5 years (if not forever). 
    'Optimism is the faith that leads to achievement' - Helen Keller
  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Bath, SomersetPosts: 1,260
    I think they look brilliant, especially if you wanted to hide bins or an oil tank. I quite enjoy training my pryacantha on its trellis.
  • madpenguinmadpenguin Isle of WightPosts: 938
    edited 11 October
    hogweed said:
    I think they would be ok as a small screen but I don't think many people could or would, devote the necessary time to tying in and/or pruning almost every shoot for upwards of 5 years (if not forever). 
    People do it with fruit trees (espalier etc.) so I see no reason why they would not devote time to this.
    On the other hand you could buy them ready in pots if you don't mind forking out over £150 a time!!
    “Every day is ordinary, until it isn't.” - Bernard Cornwell-Death of Kings
  • RubytooRubytoo On the sofa, Southerly aspect.Posts: 152
    edited 11 October
    I can see what you mean madpenguin, I nearly fell off the sofa at £150 too :D
    Another one I have seen in the ground near a friends house is one of the Cotoneasters, they grew them to be a small tall narrow hedge not much wider that what you have shown. It was in a tiny short narrow front garden to shield their windows from the very close pavement.
    Forget which but it looked amazing. It might have been  C. simondsii, if that is a smallish evergreen leaved one. Friend has moved so don't go around that way anymore.
    The structure was solidly woody, they must have kept it clipped to within an inch of its life for a number of years.

    I think Eleagnus you can keep as a fairly narrow hedge anyway in the ground so a good candidate as per your photos. And your photo shows the Eleagnus with flowers which is great, cos they are.
  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 2,219
    It's all about what time you are prepared for wall training. Many shrubs are suitable to be trained this way, but Pyracantha always look brilliant. I have also seen Camellias trained this way - into a slim hedge. 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 21,680
    I can see the value if you want a decorative screen in your garden, and you have the time and energy to spend on it. Useful to separate different areas, especially if your garden is small, but that's a lot of work for screening bins or an oil tank!
    As you'd need a framework anyway, you could do that much more simply [and cheaply] with one ivy on a trellis. Bit of training initially, then a quick job each year with shears or a hedgetrimmer.  ;)
    to walk through a forest is to touch the past

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