Sedum

diana 1diana 1 Posts: 99
I took lot's of cuttings this year and one of them was Sedum's. Lucky me I took 20 cuttings and all took but they are now flowering. Do I cut the flower heads off or leave them to flower.
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  • Kitty 2Kitty 2 ManchesterPosts: 4,424
    I always pinch off any flowers on cuttings diana.
    In my mind it stops the plant putting it's energy into blooming and into stronger root growth instead.

    Well done on such successful cuttings👍. I've never tried sedums before. Did you simply pop a leaf in a pot? I might try pinching some off my neighbours plant.
  • diana 1diana 1 Posts: 99
    I thought I needed to pinch out the top growth but wanted to sure.

    I used a really sharp knife and cut off close to the plant stem, made up a gritty compost mix, made a slit in the compost and popped them in pushed the compost back round it. If you try it keep them watered but not wet and in a light position but not direct sunlight, mine were on a bright window cill. If you look on the web Carol Klein has a video on how to take them that's how I found out what to do. This is my first year of propagating plant normally only grow veg. Good luck if you give a go it really easy. 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 21,680
    You can do either Diana. They're so easy, and it won't make a lot of difference. More forgiving than many plants, but as Kitty says, generally you'd pinch out [especially at this time of year] and let the cutting become bushier before planting out.

    Really easy Kitty. You can pull pieces off and stick them in a little pot of gritty compost and they just grow...like magic  ;)
    to walk through a forest is to touch the past

  • diana 1diana 1 Posts: 99
    Thank you Fairygirl, I have now pinched out the flower heads as I want them to bush out. I don't know what I will do with them all as I didn't expect the whole 20 to take. Still I can put a clump of three in the back garden and the same in the front and I expect friend would like some.

    Must go and put all the small pots together round the side of the house so they don't get blow over in the high winds we have been to to expect, it's very windy out there now and they say it is going to get worse.
  • Kitty 2Kitty 2 ManchesterPosts: 4,424
    Thanks for the tips diana and Fairy 😊.
    I'll go knocking for a stem to dissect (she owes me more than a few favours 😉).
  • diana 1diana 1 Posts: 99
    Kitty, only the lead you don't need the stem.
  • Guernsey Donkey2Guernsey Donkey2 Posts: 4,463
    If you have surplus plants Diana, and your sedum look good and healthy at the moment - (I too would remove the flowers on all cuttings in their first year) - donate some to your local charity shop/church/school fete or indeed any charity next Spring - they will be pleased to sell them to raise a few pounds.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 21,680
    Diana - a good place to put small pots is in among other planting, especially if you have some evergreens. They get protection from all kinds of weather, and once watered, they don't dry out so readily, making it easier to maintain them.
    They don't get baked by sun if you have it,  they don't  get battered by heavy rain, and they get protection from frost, ice and snow, so it's an ideal environment for most plants.  :)
    Just remember where you've put them though.... :D
    to walk through a forest is to touch the past

  • diana 1diana 1 Posts: 99
    Fairygirl, That's a great idea never thought of that. I went outside and made some protection with bricks and wood for now as I'm building a 6ft x 2ft 6 inch cold frame as I realize my little plastic green house it not enough any more, would love a big green house. Friend came round to collect some fruit and said this is a mini nursery so I really need it sorted. But thanks for the tip it will get me through the winter with the plants. 
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 21,680
    It works well for me Diana. The only drawback is that you sometimes forget plants you've shoved somewhere  - and discover them a year later  ;)
    Hardy little plants cope fine though - from strawberries to sedums, hebes to heucheras  :)
    to walk through a forest is to touch the past

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