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Moving a large Sedum

I need to move a large sedum, approx 3 ft high, in the next couple of weeks.  It can't be left any longer than that as it is coming from a neighbour's house which is being sold.  Should I / can I cut it back before moving?
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  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,585
    Yes.  It'll make it easier to move but also cause less stress to the plant as its roots get used to their new home.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,243
    You can also take loads of cuttings from it  KT. I assume you mean the big iceplants?
    They take so easily - just pull bits off and pot up in gritty compost. I brought a smallish one here 5 years ago from a previous garden - it's now about three or four large plants.  I potted up a tiny bit that I knocked off one a while ago. It's already rooting and trying hard to flower  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • madpenguinmadpenguin Isle of WightPosts: 2,422
    Take cuttings as suggested or divide up the rootball for more plants.

    “Every day is ordinary, until it isn't.” - Bernard Cornwell-Death of Kings
  • KT53KT53 Posts: 6,422
    Thanks for the help everybody.  I'll try to take some cuttings but I really want to save the main plant too.  It's from the garden of very dear friends who have both sadly died in the past couple of years.  The house is now being sold but I've been told I can take anything I want, which is very kind.
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 31,602
    I find they break into smaller clumps as you move them.
    Devon.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,243
    As Hosta says - they often break up, so you'll probably get the whole plant out, but it may be in several pieces KT. Those pieces will plant up no problem, so you would be able to make one clump with them again. If you cut them back to make it easier to establish them, the cut pieces will make new plants. 
    Either way - you should be successful.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 31,602
    You can leave the cut stems to dry overnight, then plant them once the end has "calloused over" they root very easily .
    Devon.
  • KT53KT53 Posts: 6,422
    I've done very little in the way of taking cutting so need some advice.  Once the ends have had a chance to callouse over can I simply stick them into the soil?  Our soil is light and free draining.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 46,243
    I've never let them callous over KT, although I know that's certainly a way of doing it. 
    I just take a piece, any sort of size, but a few inches is ideal, cut it below a joint in the usual way, and stick them in a pot of gritty compost. Either two or three in a 4 inch pot, or single ones in a 2 inch pot. In summer, you could literally take a piece and shove it in the ground and it'll grow.
    I've never had an issue whichever way I do it. They don't seem to mind what you do!  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • Bagpuss57Bagpuss57 South West Posts: 256
    I have done the same as fairygirl and have always had success, they are the easiest plants to move and take cuttings. But like others have said if replanting it's best to cut it back. It'll grow up next year no probs. 
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