Forum home Tools and techniques

We don't need plastic pots - they need to be banned!

1235718

Posts

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 74,875
    While having my morning shower I wondered ... how many of us are showering with plastic sponges and plastic scrub/cloths ... and washing tiny fragments of plastic down the drains ... eventually ending up in the rivers and oceans?   o 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 6,846
    If I can extend the rant slightly; I'm getting really annoyed that Titchmarch is stubbornly defending his use of plastic grass on TV shows. He's featured in GW magazine and BBC Wildlife now saying there's 'no viable alternative' in certain situations. I call bulls**t on that. With all the resources of the BBC at his disposal he can't find a better solution than using plastic grass? No reclaimed paving materials? No sustainable decking painted green? In his position he should be leading the way in responsible garden design and yet he's spending more energy defending his use of plastic grass which is just giving people more excuses to follow his lead. I see more and more people using plastic grass as a temporary solution now. A quick fix for a couple of years to cover a bare bit of ground until they can sort out something better and then it will be ripped up and chucked in a skip. It used to be laughed at but with people like Alan showing it to be a viable material on TV the use is rising rapidly. He might say he only used a small square of the stuff but he's responsible for a lot more by proxy.
    A great library has something in it to offend everybody.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 26,964
    Have to agree.  Plastic grass is just wrong and also unimaginative.  Paving, pebbles, gravel, slate chippings, chamomile lawns are all so much better.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 74,875
    I suspect that some folk (mentioning no names at all) may find recommending various types of 'landscaping product' to be 'beneficial' to them in one way or another ... or am I getting too cynical in my old age?  
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • B3B3 Posts: 19,969
    I suspect that the fashion for plastic grass will eventually go the way of stone cladding and decking.
    I wouldn't fancy removing some of the stuff that's deposited on my grass from plastic shag pile. :s
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • stewyfizzstewyfizz West BromwichPosts: 161
    Awful stuff. Good enough only for the fruit and veg man at the market to display his boxes on. 
    Gardening. The cause of, and solution to, all of my problems.
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 30,458
    Right, here's a question. 
    You go into the garden centre, 2 identical plants, one in a black plastic pot, the other in a super duper eco friendly pot. How much extra would you pay for the latter? ( we all know it's going to be dearer, otherwise they'd be used already )  10%, 25%, 50%?
    Devon.
  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 10,338
    You are right @Hostafan1, which is why, in time, the solution has to no choice.
    Southern trees bear a strange fruit
    Blood on the leaves and blood at the root
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 6,846
    A quick google suggests a 16cm coir pot would cost about 20p more than a black plastic equivalent. I suspect the prices would be lower at trade level though. Perhaps a tax on platic pots would level the field a bit?

    I don't know about everyone else but larger pots are coveted and reused until completely useless in my garden even if it means using duct tape on the cracks. Anything over 16cm is a good pot but it's the smaller ones that end up stacking up in quantity and those are the ones that are easier to replace with coir or similar. Just replacing the small pots in garden centres would make a huge impact on the amount of plastic used in gardens. If a ban or tax on pots were brought in it could be initially for pots of 6" or smaller. This would be especially useful for the brand new pots sold in the cheapo shops at 10 for £1 or whatever they are.

    If China doesn't want our plastic anymore then we have to reduce the amount of plastic goods we import from there or we're just adding to the problem here. Maybe a new trade mark is needed for goods made of UK recycled plastic to go along with better markings on commonly recycleable plastics.
    A great library has something in it to offend everybody.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 26,964
    Sweden is on the brink of having 0% of its rubbish going to landfill.  They have found ways to sort/recycle or make energy form waste that now leaves them ready to import rubbish.  It's not that far away and they speak good English. 

    Time for UK and other councils to go an see how and what?

    I too find large pots hard to source and, having started again here in this new garden, I have no trouble using up all my small pots and re-using them again and again.   That is surely the way to go - less chucking and more re-use.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
Sign In or Register to comment.