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We don't need plastic pots - they need to be banned!

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  • ZeroZero1ZeroZero1 Posts: 576
    edited September 2018
    So many items of plastic on the supermarket shelves could contain little or no plastic. For example - bottles of shampoo, beauty products, bottles of cleaning fluid, in fact every plastic bottle could be replaced by glass. Technical goods could have wooden housings (like old days), or metal. Goods like yoghurt and margarine tubs could be paper. All fruit and veg could be delivered and sold plastic free, all fast food containers could be waxed paper. 
    I would say over 90% of our plastic use could be substituted. 
    Cars could have wooden dashboards again. more use of metals, and as Wild edges above inferred, plastic toys are NOT necessary. 
    It comes down to industry not wanting to retool. They want to make us feel guilty be focusing on coffee cups and carrier bags, rather than industrial packaging. This is propagandist manipulation in my view. 
  • BenCottoBenCotto RutlandPosts: 3,621
    The rubbish is being collected anyway. That the bin is minutely fuller as it contains “huge” milk containers - and ours are crushed which reduces the volume - means that the extra cost to the council tax payer is infinitesimal. The cost is certainly much, much less than the premium you pay for having milk delivered, milk that in summer had turned to yoghurt after being left on a hot front step while out at work.

    I’m not saying we don’t have a duty to be custodians of our environment but hyperbole will not convince me.
  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 5,575
    edited September 2018
    It's not as simple as that really. For many years the emphasis has been on reducing energy, reducing fuel consumption. Glass is heavy and bulky, so it takes more fuel to move the same amount of 'product'. 'Back in the day', produce wasn't moved around to the extent it is now so the costs for moving stuff and the need to keep it in air tight packaging to extend shelf life weren't nearly as much an issue as they are now. We would have to completely restructure our supply chains to go back to local supply and distribution, rather than the vast and centralised systems that our supermarkets use now. And given the cost of fuel now, inevitably prices would go up.

    Or you could just shop locally and stay away from the supermarkets.
    “Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first” 
  • ZeroZero1ZeroZero1 Posts: 576
    edited September 2018
    Picadae:

    Even where plastic goes into a "recycle" bin, it does not ensure it will be recycled. Much goes to landfill or is exported to  cause problems in other parts of the planet

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-45496884


    https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/uk-plastic-pollution-oceans-recycling-export-waste-malaysia-vietnam-thailand-a8400761.html












  • It's not as simple as that really. For many years the emphasis has been on reducing energy, reducing fuel consumption. Glass is heavy and bulky, so it takes more fuel to move the same amount of 'product'. 'Back in the day', produce wasn't moved around to the extent it is now so the costs for moving stuff and the need to keep it in air tight packaging to extend shelf life weren't nearly as much an issue as they are now. We would have to completely restructure our supply chains to go back to local supply and distribution, rather than the vast and centralised systems that our supermarkets use now. And given the cost of fuel now, inevitably prices would go up.

    Or you could just shop locally and stay away from the supermarkets.
    Energy and fuel consumption are important of course, but a trivial amount of plastic has terrible effects on the environment for centuries. For instance, many sea birds and fish are ingesting plastic and the world's oceans have less plastic than land. Microplastic stays in the environment and is ingested but often not excreted, as it moves down and up the food chain. 
  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 5,575
    I'm not disagreeing with you on the principle, ZZ1, only to your contention that it's an easy swap. It's not unlike the diesel cars problem - for many years we were told that we should buy diesels because they are more fuel efficient so better for the planet. Now we're told that the particulate emissions from them is seriously damaging the local environment (air quality), so a different priority has emerged and suddenly diesels are bad. It takes a while for the industry and our minds to change when we are suddenly presented with an absolutely contrary argument to something we thought we knew for sure.
    “Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first” 
  • Hazel and Raisin,
     I see your point, but we need to act fast, give industry the leeway and they will drag their heels. Only banning will do the trick. I am thinking bout the buckets that fried chicken comes in, these are manufactured now and could easily house a plant with little modification. As usual, the industry (plastics) will obfuscate, the longer we delay, the more nature suffers, but this of course goes unnoticed.

    I was thinking last night of "Dirty Protests" that is, when we find an inexcusable piece of packaging, send it right back to the manufacture by post. If enough people did this it would generate publicity and manufacturers would act. 
  • Hampshire_HogHampshire_Hog Hampshire Coast 100m from the seaPosts: 1,089
    A lot of talk of using glass, Glass is a very polluting process using toxic chemicals and huge amounts of fuel all your doing is removing one pollutant and replacing it with another. Be careful what you wish for.

    "You don't stop gardening because you get old, you get old because you stop gardening." - The Hampshire Hog
  • Hampshire Hog I think you ave a fair point, but glass behaves like rock (silicon, quartz) in the environment and is less harmful in the long run. The real solution is to develop an economy that is not reliant on rampant consumerism.... but this is another tale
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 19,951
    I think the real solution is to cut population, birth control would be a good start. 
    From my OH’s family alone there are 13 cars on the road.

    If you don’t want black flower pots, don’t buy them, how many times do people visit garden centres and say ‘ this this and this just fell into my trolly or followed me home’?
    everyone does their bit to keep this rubbish going, throw away food, throw away this that and the other, don’t buy it, you won’t need to throw it away. 
    All we can do is to watch ourselves, we can’t watch the rest of the world. 
    I sometimes feel I am the only one trying to cut down on ‘stuff’ , I try my best, we don’t have waste but then I look along the road on bin day and there are 4/5 bags of rubbish outside people houses and I think why am I bothering’ 

    Rant over, I’ll get my coat. 


    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

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