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We don't need plastic pots - they need to be banned!

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  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,368
    Car and lorry tyres do far more harm to the environment than black plastic pots do ...  we really do need to stop using them too ... 
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 7,512
    Car and lorry tyres do far more harm to the environment than black plastic pots do ...  we really do need to stop using them too ... 
    and chewing gum. If anything should be made illegal it's chewing gum, or at least the ones made of plastic.
    A great library has something in it to offend everybody.
  • SkandiSkandi Northern DenmarkPosts: 1,446
    If it's purely the colour that stops them being recycled then ban that colour, really I don't think the plant cares if it's pot is black or pink with polka dots so long as it lets no light in.

    I don't buy bedding plants or any short stay plants as it were, this year I have bought fruit trees and a gunnera. they all came in black plastic pots of course. now the gunnera would not have been an issue in terracotta as it was already expensive and the price of the pot would not have added much, but the fruit trees would have been unmovable in heavier pots. and they are around 5 years old so too old really to be bare rooted. (I hate bareroot trees they take years and years to produce and often turn out to be dead, after they have taken so much damage being dug up. and you can only plant them 1 or two months a year!)

    Right now outside I have 120 strawberry runners than I am potting into pots. also black plastic, (which as it happens I bought new (empty) this year for tomato seedlings) now I could let them root and then dig them up but they do not do as well again due to root disturbance, and none of the "good" alternatives will survive outside half buried in the soil over winter.

    Where I am I can recycle them, and even if I just threw them in the bin they would be burnt for heat/electricity. So until something turns up that does the same job at the same price or they are banned I will continue using them.
    For seed trays I also use plastic, but there I reuse meat and mushroom trays from the supermarket.

    As an interesting note we are told here by the state that if you wash out a bottle with warm water and soap, you have wasted MORE energy than would be saved by recycling it. The long and short of it is that we have too many people and the people are too rich.

    I'm with others that going plastic free is impossible, I looked at trying it for a week but we would starve.  I could grow most vegetables plastic free. but even there there are problems, seed potatoes/onions come in plastic. insect netting is plastic, the alternative (sprays) come in plastic, even my chickens are not plastic free, their concentrated food comes in plastic bags, the grain I feed them from hessian bags, I drove to pick that up using oil and a car that's made of lots of plastic. the straw is baled with plastic string.
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 7,512
    I wonder how many million metres of baling twine is kicking about the British countryside?
    A great library has something in it to offend everybody.
  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 5,547
    I wonder how many million metres of baling twine is kicking about the British countryside?
    There's at least 5 miles of it in a bundle I've picked up on our place (an old barn). It frays into tiny bits and blows across the fields, where, presumably, the cows and sheep eat it  :/

    Plastic is extremely useful - chemically relatively inert, lightweight, capable of being airtight, malleable, infinitely useful and so we have used it. Rather like burning coal as a fuel - we survived for millennia as a species without it, but having found it and found out how much more effective it is than everything we used before, we have adopted it universally. We worked out the problem with burning coal for house fires back in the 1950s and have found ways since then to reduce it. Hopefully we'll do the same with plastic packaging - there are some uses for which it can't sensibly be replaced but at the moment we do seem to see it as a free for all, with plastic bags wrapped in plastic bags inside plastic boxes.

    I have been known to take excessive packaging back to the shop (electrical goods most often) and just left it at the tills.

    But one point of order - I don't think garden centres did exist for years before plastic pots. They are a modern phenomenon that arrived with wider car ownership and the industrialisation of growing plants, all of which was intrinsically bound up with plastic use increasing after WWII. 
    “Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first” 
  • Hostafan1 said:
    I work in Waitrose and nobody complained about the 5p charge for carrier bags. Most are well aware of the rationale behind it.
    Ditto when we stopped giving disposable cups for our free coffee scheme. Many provided their own re-usable cups long before we stopped giving away free coffees.

    Respect to you Hosta. On a recent visit to Waitrose I asked for a coffee, was told I would have to bring my own cup or buy a new one. As i was thirsty i bought one - it was plastic and much more substantial that a conventional cup - just saying. 
  • NewBoy2NewBoy2 BristolPosts: 1,804
    I agree we should reduce and in some areas eliminate plastic AND I DO ON A DAILY BASIS BY BUYING VEG AND HANDING THE PLASTIC PACKAGING TO THE CHECK OUT PERSON TO RECYCLE AT THE SUPERMARKET

    The situation will be the packaging manager called to the CEO ,s office who will decide they can get away with using plastic until sales start dropping off

    THE ONLY WAY TO FORCE A CHANGE IS TO STOP BUYING PLASTIC POTS...........ITS LITERALLY IN OUR HANDS
    Everyone is just trying to be Happy.....So lets help Them.
  • NewBoy2 said:
    I agree we should reduce and in some areas eliminate plastic AND I DO ON A DAILY BASIS BY BUYING VEG AND HANDING THE PLASTIC PACKAGING TO THE CHECK OUT PERSON TO RECYCLE AT THE SUPERMARKET

    The situation will be the packaging manager called to the CEO ,s office who will decide they can get away with using plastic until sales start dropping off

    THE ONLY WAY TO FORCE A CHANGE IS TO STOP BUYING PLASTIC POTS...........ITS LITERALLY IN OUR HANDS
    With respect to you I disagree. Paraquat, for example, continued to be used until it was banned. Most people really don't give a damn about the environment and think nothing about plastic. It's the responsibility of governments, as manufacturers are only looking at their profit
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 7,512
    I still have neighbours that refuse to recycle. We've had bin collections reduced to every 3 weeks with flyers saying that people will be fined for using more than one wheely bin but they just take the bags off elsewhere. One neighbour takes a (single use) carrier bag of rubbish with her to work every day. It will take a law and enfoced fines to get them to recycle and even then I have no doubt that they will be the people contaminating the recycling stream. It can only be in our hands if we have enough willing hands to take action.
    A great library has something in it to offend everybody.
  • NollieNollie Girona, Catalunya, Northen Spain.Posts: 5,642
    Late to the party, but just to say, most plants I buy in GC’s here increasingly come in these sturdy, stackable, size-standardised 100% recyclable pots - purple, green, blue, yellow, maroon, you name it...all healthy, well-rooted plants that do not seem to have suffered from having a colourful pot so I just don’t buy the ‘it has to be black to grow plants well’ argument espoused on GW. I reuse them for growing on young plants and will be doing so until they crumble.




    It’s the 9cm plastic black pots (from mailorder nurseries) I have a surfeit of and can’t recycle. Since the plants they enclose are either planted out or potted on immediately, a recyclable tetrapak type material or similar would, I think,  more than suffice for those. Given they are crammed together in the nursery or GC, usually in those metal growing tables with raised edges that effectively cut out all light anyway, again, I don’t buy the insistence on black plastic.
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