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Ghastly American imports

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  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 28,603
    I thought the crust was for eating later that night when you've got " the munchies"
    Devon.
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 18,037
    MrsGlaze said:
    I'm having a proper Cornish pasty for tea tonight, 
    I bet you’re not, a proper Cornish Pasty had stewed sweet apple in one half of it, thus doing away with a separate desert. 😀
    but then perhaps you are, I can’t see your pasty. 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 70,495
    Like a Bedfordshire Clanger ...

    "“The Bedfordshire Clanger is a dish from the English county of Bedfordshire, dating back to at least the 19th century. The clanger is an elongated suet crust dumpling similar to a pasty, with a savoury filling at one end and a sweet filling at the other, comprising a main course and dessert in one package. It is traditionally steamed but may be baked for robustness. The crust was not originally intended for consumption but to protect the fillings from the soiled hands of the workers....  The savoury end is traditionally meat with diced potatoes and vegetables (although a filling without meat is also possible), and the sweet end is usually jam, or sweetened apple or other fruit. Traditionally the top of the clanger is scored with a few lines to denote the sweet end.

    Historically, the Bedfordshire Clanger was made by women for their husbands to take to their agricultural work as a midday meal. The dish is still available at various bakers and served at some hotels, restaurants and local places of interest.”

    http://www.myvirginkitchen.com/recipe/bedfordshire-clanger/

    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • Mary370Mary370 Limerick, Ireland Posts: 2,001
    @Dovefromabove that does sound lovely.........never realised they originally contained both sweet and savoury
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 274
    edited September 2018
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  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 70,495
    MrsGlaze said:
    Lyn said:
    MrsGlaze said:
    I'm having a proper Cornish pasty for tea tonight, 
    I bet you’re not, a proper Cornish Pasty had stewed sweet apple in one half of it, thus doing away with a separate desert. 😀
    but then perhaps you are, I can’t see your pasty. 
    You are right it wasn't, but it was pretty darn good :)@Dovefromabove is that where the expression of dropping a clanger originates from? I'd be gutted to drop one of those!
    Dunno @[email protected] ... according to my late Ma (who was from Bedfordshire and despite her usually abysmal cooking skills she made a good clanger) the name comes from the fact that a 'clanger pudding' resembled the clanger in a church bell ... so possibly dropping a clanger comes from the noisy one, not the tasty one?  
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







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  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 25,805
    Slight change of direction - I love maple syrup.   That's a great export.   Don't indulge often but sometimes it just hits the spot.  Tamla Motown and Atlantic Soul are great too.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 3,532
    edited September 2018
    So was Paul Robeson, in more ways than one.
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