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Rose Cuttings

Watching Monty Don in latest episode, he said that he took rose cuttings. I have always been told that roses need a root stock and cannot be properly cloned by taking cuttings?
Monty did not mention any root stock or grafting

???
Z

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  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 87,894
    edited September 2018
    Many roses grow perfectly well on their own roots, particularly bush, rambler and species types.

    Hybrid Tea varieties are usually grafted in order to influence the growth but even many of them will grow successfully from cuttings. 


    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 34,864
    root stocks are used simply to get lots of plants produced very quickly.
    Devon.
  • ZeroZero1 said:
    Watching Monty Don in latest episode, he said that he took rose cuttings. I have always been told that roses need a root stock and cannot be properly cloned by taking cuttings?
    Monty did not mention any root stock or grafting

    ???
    Z
    Funnily enough, I was also inspired by the same episode and took 4 cuttings of 2 bush roses. They're all doing well, so far. I'm in London and it's still very warm here. 
  • ObelixxObelixx Posts: 30,013
    I took cuttings of some of my roses before we moved at the end of September '16.  Jammed pencil thick stems into compost in terracotta pots and wrote the name on each pot.  Several have succeeded but some failed completely.  Needless to say the indelible ink washed off...........but I recognise 3 as being baby Queen of Sweden as they've been flowering all summer.  Will have to wait to see what the others are.
    Vendée - 20kms from Atlantic coast.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Obelixx said:
    I took cuttings of some of my roses before we moved at the end of September '16.  Jammed pencil thick stems into compost in terracotta pots and wrote the name on each pot.  Several have succeeded but some failed completely.  Needless to say the indelible ink washed off...........but I recognise 3 as being baby Queen of Sweden as they've been flowering all summer.  Will have to wait to see what the others are.
    Yep - indelible ink that washes off - been there!
    I have my (also pencil thick) cutting in a tall, plastic pot that one of the roses had come in. Fingers crossed.
  • MarlorenaMarlorena Posts: 8,631
    edited September 2018
    It should be pointed out that rootstocks, which are grown from seed for use here, are also used because it's adaptable to growing in all British soils.  A number of roses especially Japanese Rugosa types will not tolerate chalk if grown on their own roots and will become chlorotic.. The rootstock ensures they can be grown here in such gardens... other roses too will show signs of chlorosis on their own roots, if too much lime is present... it just depends..

    Roses will often put down their own roots even if grafted, and a favourite way of mine, which used to be termed 'Irishman's cuttings', is to yank a piece of cane from a rose that's growing up from below ground, pulling it up and if it has roots on the bottom, which it may well have, ...well there you go, a ready made new rose.. I've just done this with a climbing rose and replanted it..

    I've not watched the programme but I suspect Mr Don uses the old method of digging a trench, filling with sand and putting his cuttings in the ground for the winter... a more modern approach, simpler and cleaner, is to use the Burrito Method... which involves wrapping the cuttings up in newspaper like a Mexican Burrito..
    google Burrito method rose cuttings...  trial and error... I've just done some...
    East Anglia, England
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