Monty’s garden scissors

24

Posts

  • K67K67 Leicestershire Posts: 538
    I have a pair as photo from allotment boy but they are a pain to use, the clip won't stay in place and locks the scissors when you don't want them locked. The spring clip had a habit of pinging off but the seller sent another with no quibble and it's fine now.
     I  much prefer to use an old pair of dressmaking scissors 
  • KT53KT53 Posts: 3,710
    B3 said:
    I use large old scissors for cutting the edge of the lawn when I'm weeding, or for cutting back things hanging over the grass or trimming dead iris leaves and smaller scissors for dead heading. 
    I've never  heard of gardening scissors. Are they different in any way?
    Very different.  By including the word 'Gardening' in the description they can increase the price and make more profit. :D
  • B3B3 Posts: 10,736
    A nice wooden handle usually bumps up the price too, I find.
    Some of by most useful tools aren't gardening tools at all. A wallpaper scraper makes a great hand hoe.a slater's hammer is great for hacking at dry clay or levering out roots. And I have a great little plastic hand rake that's great for getting debris off the soil without damaging the plants and that cost me 99p. A cheese knife is great for getting the weeds out from between paving slabs.
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • Hostafan1Hostafan1 Posts: 22,786
    B3 said:
    A nice wooden handle usually bumps up the price too, I find.
    Some of by most useful tools aren't gardening tools at all. A wallpaper scraper makes a great hand hoe.a slater's hammer is great for hacking at dry clay or levering out roots. And I have a great little plastic hand rake that's great for getting debris off the soil without damaging the plants and that cost me 99p. A cheese knife is great for getting the weeds out from between paving slabs.
    Is there a tool for splitting hostas and other herbaceous stuff better than a bread knife?
    Devon.
  • B3B3 Posts: 10,736
    edited September 2018
    With the number you have hosta, you could do with one of those round  saw things you get for splitting planks in sawmills.
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • Bright starBright star Wrea GreenPosts: 690
    I’m with you there, Hostafan, perfect tool for the job. I’ve even used an axe on some larger pot bound Hostas.
    Life's tragedy is that we get old too soon and wise too late.

  • B3B3 Posts: 10,736
    Did you give it 40 whacks?
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • MuddyForkMuddyFork North HampshirePosts: 435
    I use wallpaper scissors as they have long blades
  • Papi JoPapi Jo Brittany, France Posts: 2,137
    Pete8 said:
    I have a pair of ARS 190mm Fruit Picking Shears which are very good for cutting back and light pruning
    Those look very useful indeed.
    You are invited to a virtual visit of my garden (in English or in French).
  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 3,250
    edited September 2018
    That tool posted by Allotment Boy looks like a total nightmare to use. That spring bit is the issue. No good for light work, but I can't see it coping with heavier work either. An in-between tool that really should be a pair of scissors or secateurs. Normal scissors should deal with Alchemilla Mollis.

    For me, gardening on the miniature with pots only, I'm like B3, many of the tools come from un-gardening merchandise. Mainly kitchen ones do the work nicely. It's a knife, fork and a pair of scissors. But have to admit, a bit jealous with some of the tools mentioned.
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