Anyone used these? Concrete post wire anchors



Ive got concrete fence posts and these look like a great way to set up training wires. Has anyone here had experience of using these?


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  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 18,141
    Not me but there was a thread about training wires last spring and these were mentioned and highly recommended by someone. 
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 2,401
    Yes, I've got them.  I started putting them up two years ago, so far two levels of brackets with "Gripple" nylon cord.  My plants have since grown to the height that a further set of brackets and cord is overdue.  It's easier to put up the brackets, thread and tension the wire if you have a second pair of hands, but you can do it by yourself.  Make sure you measure your fence posts and order the right size.  I didn't realise my fence posts weren't all the same, and the brackets I bought are a bit too big for some of them.  I have got away with it by wedging bits of wood to fill the gaps.
  • Knuxs7Knuxs7 Posts: 19
    That's actually a really good idea! I've just been using the wooden fence by the side of the panels to try and hang stuff. Total bodge and needs doing every year. These things seem a good solution actually! #research time
  • josusa47 said:
    Yes, I've got them.  I started putting them up two years ago, so far two levels of brackets with "Gripple" nylon cord.  My plants have since grown to the height that a further set of brackets and cord is overdue.  It's easier to put up the brackets, thread and tension the wire if you have a second pair of hands, but you can do it by yourself.  Make sure you measure your fence posts and order the right size.  I didn't realise my fence posts weren't all the same, and the brackets I bought are a bit too big for some of them.  I have got away with it by wedging bits of wood to fill the gaps.
    Thanks.

    Have they coped over the two years? Sturdy?

    im planning to use them for wires across 3 posts (2 fence panels) to train a climbing rose and eventually some clematis too.

    ill be using 3mm wire rope and turnbuckles as that's what I've used before with my apple tree and works out cheaper than the gripple system
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 4,750
    edited August 2018
    I've also used them.
    I've got them across 4 fence panels to support pear cordons. I put up just over a year ago.
    Another across 1 fence panel to train a blackberry. I put up a couple of weeks ago.

    Very pleased with them.
    I have used the brackets and the gripple system - easy and effective

    PS as @josusa47 mentioned there maybe gaps. What I did is to bend the brackets slightly so the gap that fits around the post slot was a bit smaller. Worked fine.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
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  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 2,401
    They've coped fine.  Mine are on two stretches of fence, longer than yours, supporting honeysuckle, summer and winter jasmine, and I've tied back some tall annuals to the cord when they started to lean away from the fence.
  • One of my posts is awkward - the depth between front and the slot for fence is greater on one side than the other.

    How many did you use per post, out of interest? And have you just used them at either end of the wire run, or used some on the posts in between.

    im hoping I can make do with just two anchors on either end of the wire. It's a 3.9m run. But the run between vine eyes on the wires for my new espalier apple tree is 4.8m yet the wires with the turnbuckles aren't sagging at all and can be tightened up further if need be.
  • These look great, any amazon links, or other suppliers? Please :)
  • If you google wire anchors it's the first site that comes up. 

    Theres also postfix brackets which are very similar - they are available on Amazon or their own website
  • Thanks
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