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Soot

Valley GardenerValley Gardener Rhondda ValleyPosts: 2,351
I'm sorry about the heading,it's not really a problem. I feel that the soil around my neck of the woods is extremely black,and could be due to old coal dust ant soot.I have been told that 60 years ago in these valleys everything was just black,and kids got sent off to the mountains to play,taking their lunch,above the black air!
Would this be a problem,or a good thing with the soil? As I'm new to the area,and none of my neighbours has a garden,it's made me think? 
The whole truth is an instrument that can only be played by an expert.

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  • Valley GardenerValley Gardener Rhondda ValleyPosts: 2,351
    I'm sorry about the heading,it's not really a problem. I feel that the soil around my neck of the woods is extremely black,and could be due to old coal dust and soot.I have been told that 60 years ago in these valleys everything was just black,and kids got sent off to the mountains to play,taking their lunch,above the black air!
    Would this be a problem,or a good thing with the soil? As I'm new to the area,and none of my neighbours has a garden,it's made me think? 

    The whole truth is an instrument that can only be played by an expert.
  • Papi JoPapi Jo Brittany, France Posts: 3,449
    Makes me think of the "How Green Was My Valley" film. Anyway, I would check in the vicinity, surely there must be some gardens around.

    You are invited to a virtual visit of my garden (in English or in French).
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 20,131
    How Green was my Valley sprang to my mind too, Papi Jo. Beautiful book.

    I well remember celery in the greengrocer’s being clarted in soot. Something to do with keeping things from eating it, as I recall.

    It certainly did nothing to encourage me to take a bite out of it.

    Mind you, in those days, celery could have done the job of a roof timber.

    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • Joyce21Joyce21 Posts: 15,489
    When I was young, many moons ago, my father would put soot somewhere in the garden (can't remember where) after the chimney had been swept.
    SW Scotland
  • herbaceousherbaceous E. BerksPosts: 2,278
    Bottom of the runner bean trench @Joyce21?
    "The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."  Sir Terry Pratchett
  • Joyce21Joyce21 Posts: 15,489
    He didn't grow beans @herbaceous.  I remember it being put in an area where there were delphiniums and rhubarb near the compost heap.
    Maybe it protected the delphiniums from slugs and snails.
    SW Scotland
  • herbaceousherbaceous E. BerksPosts: 2,278
    Ah, that's sounds like a good idea @Joyce21! My Dad used to put soot in his bean trench, he didn't grow delphiniums - in fact he didn't really grow any ornamental flowers.

    Delphiniums make me sad because of the poor dormouse  :'(   and chrysanthemums make me cross for the same reason 
    "The trouble with having an open mind, of course, is that people will insist on coming along and trying to put things in it."  Sir Terry Pratchett
  • Valley GardenerValley Gardener Rhondda ValleyPosts: 2,351
    As you say there must be gardens somewhere,but twenty houses either way are decked,slabbed gravelled or lawned! Probably all out to work poor things,or maybe got large allotments!
    The whole truth is an instrument that can only be played by an expert.
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