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My Acer Palmatum Dissectum has arrived...

RaspberryKillerRaspberryKiller Richmond, LondonPosts: 156
No pictures, unfortunately, since my phone has died on me, and I can't locate the cable for my DSLR.

Anyhow, I have a few questions, since it's looking far from perfect, but I am certainly not writing it off.

1) All the branch growth seems to be on one side - I'm guessing this has the potential to be a very lopsided tree. Suggestions?

2) Many of the younger branches are crossing and are clumped together. I could 'encourage' them to take a different direction with tape and cord (gently, of course) but I'm not sure how effective this would be, or, if my only course would be to prune.

3) The leaves are a little brown at the tips. Most likely it's previously been getting too much sun/wind for it's liking, so I will keep it in the shade for now. Perhaps the stress of transit has also contributed?

Not sure what other initial care I could give it - I will re-pot shortly, but feel a little dejected (although I know already the hit and miss nature of ordering online - there was nowhere local that stocked them). It doesn't look the healthiest, but all being considered, I've no doubt this will be a fine looking tree given time!
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  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 45,984
    What size is it RaspK?
    You can prune them into shape, but it would depend on the size/maturity and exactly how it looks. Without a pic, it's difficult. 
    Transport can casue a couple of issues, but that isn't really a problem at this stage. Keep it shady [as you've done] and just keep it damp enough  for now.
    Also - how much did you pay for it? If it's a subsatntial amount - I'd be contacting the seller. Photos would be vital though, for you to make any discount claims or refunds.
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • RaspberryKillerRaspberryKiller Richmond, LondonPosts: 156
    Evenin'

    It's only a young thing, about 60cm tall and came in a 3 litre pot - was about £20.

    It just looks a great deal more spindly and limp than expected, although I guess I should have adjusted my expectations.

    I'm sure it will be fine, just need to wait and see how it fairs over the next few weeks :)

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 45,984
    I think that seems cheap for a plant of that size, but it may depend on the seller. The dissectums are often quite pricey. 
    If you can take photos - maybe someone could do that if you haven't got a camera just now - I think that would be helpful in case it doesn't thrive. 
    Keep an eye on it anyway, and prune out any badly crossing branches, if possible, to get it 'opened up'.
    It may come back into good growth in the next month or two, but keep it shady and don't do much apart from watering it for now. Too much food will overload it   :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • RaspberryKillerRaspberryKiller Richmond, LondonPosts: 156
    I'll take a snap on my tablet tomorrow.

    There was a sale, so I snapped one up (from a relatively reputable online store).
  • chickychicky SurreyPosts: 10,153
    Mine have all been grown from twigs - they tend to sort their shape out as they grow.  Next year, when its thinking about putting on new growth in spring, you might want to turn it so the spindly side gets the most light, to encourage growth on that side.

    Beautiful trees - hope you enjoy 😊 
    The world is a book, and those who do not travel read only one page  - St Augustine
  • Allotment BoyAllotment Boy North London Posts: 4,957
    edited August 2018
    It depends on what you want. A one sided specimen can look very architectural if that is what you would like.  It was probably gown very close to others. As it is young it is possible to re-balance the tree. You can prune out unwanted branches & as has been suggested if you turn the tree to the light, you will enhance growth on that side. You can train the branches by tying, weights, or even wiring as in bonsai all when they young. 
    Some examples; 
    We are slowly re-balancing this green one by turning the weaker side to the light


    Two shots of the same red one, not so obvious from the pictures is that  we let this arch down over the patio which is nearly 1 Metre above the rest of the garden . Both these grew this way because of where they grown originally, down the side of a Victorian terrace.  They don't have to be in pots to train them like this.




    AB Still learning

  • RaspberryKillerRaspberryKiller Richmond, LondonPosts: 156
    Those are spectacular specimens!

    Err, here is mine re-potted earlier:



    It's far 'droopier' than expected, although once it puts on a bit more growth and foliage it will have a nice 'cascading' look about it.

    All the leaves appear to be frazzled at the edges and all the main branches are drooping downwards on the same side, which is where my concern about stability is. It might be nothing, but I don't have enough experience to know!
  • Allotment BoyAllotment Boy North London Posts: 4,957
    edited August 2018
    A lot of Acers are suffering in the heatwave even ones in the ground that are apparently well watered. New ones & re-potted ones always take time to get going. Good to see you have it in the shade the green ones are less tolerant of strong sunshine when young.
    AB Still learning

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 45,984
    I think that'll be absolutely fine RK  :)
    Some of them do have a slight 'weeping' habit, but it can also be just the shock factor of being transported an dreplanted etc. As ABoy says - keep it shady until it settles in. This hot spell in so many areas makes it even harder to get anything established. We're ok up here - we've had plenty of rain now, but many areas are still struggling. You can't beat the rain falling out the sky for nice healthy growth on any plant.

    It looks quite even in growth, so I think that will grow away quite nicely for you. I'd get a few pot feet to get it clear of the paving - just to make sure there's no waterlogging until it gets established. A wee bark or gravel mulch too, and it'll look well.  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • RaspberryKillerRaspberryKiller Richmond, LondonPosts: 156
    Part of me is tempted to snip at those top three stems as they seem a little out of sorts with the rest of the plant... Must resist for now.

    Already topped off with some gravel and bark.


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