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Bamboo trees in a stony bed

Hi, We've just replaced a grassy bank at the back of the garden with a retaining wall and I was hoping to plant in some Simba bamboo trees to disguise the fence that runs the length of the wall.

I'm a little concerned how well bamboo will take to the soil as it's quite stoney and so will dry out reasonably quickly and thus, what prep I should do and whether I should look to something other than bamboo for long-term success. I've read somewhere I could fill it with loads of soil improver but it would be best to do that in a couple of months when summer's past?

I've attached some pics of the wall and soil for reference.

Any advice as to how to achieve what I want or whether I should look at something else, and what, would be appreciated. The garden is north facing but is not particularly shaded.

Thanks in advance for any help.



Posts

  • a1154a1154 Posts: 859
    That’s a great space you could do a lot with, but I like the fence and would be thinking of colourful things that look good against it, rather than bamboo to screen it, but up to you.
    Im hoping the soil isn’t as bad as it looks in the picture.  Are weeds growing ?
    Bamboo is tough stuff, but I think anything would struggle with that. I’d start a bit of a project of removing the larger stones, and look at getting some well rotted manure. 
    Do this now and start planting in autumn, flowering shrubs, perennials, get lots of colourful bulbs in etc. I started by copying a border at my local garden centre. I asked them for a planting list and they were happy to give me it. 
    Visit some gardens and see what you like. You could incorporate the bamboo into your plan, but think now about what you want it to look like when it’s finished. 
  • Kate 7Kate 7 Posts: 116
    I grew Fargesia Simba. Unfortunately it flowered and then died. I agree that you have a great space there which you could have such fun with trying different plants. By all means try some bamboos. Make sure they are not invasive and remember that they are greedy and like food and water. Could also grow plants to trail over the front edge and grow over the fence behind.
  • a1154 said:
    Im hoping the soil isn’t as bad as it looks in the picture.  Are weeds growing ? 


    The soil is very stoney (perhaps because the houses are new and that's how the builders have given the garden shape) but all the surrounding gardens seem to be flourishing, albeit after bringing in improver. I assume I'll have to do the same but was wondering when the best time to do it would be.

    I guess I thought bamboo because I liked the simplicity and uniformity.
  • ZeroZero1ZeroZero1 Posts: 564
    Just be aware that Bamboo can be really "thuggish" as they say, my duaghter inherited some in her new house and it's everywhere, its outgrown it's place, gone into their lawn, the naighbours, in between cracks in paved areas and under the foundations of a consrvatory. There is little chance of getting rid of it. 
  • ZeroZero1 said:
    Just be aware that Bamboo can be really "thuggish" as they say, my duaghter inherited some in her new house and it's everywhere, its outgrown it's place, gone into their lawn, the naighbours, in between cracks in paved areas and under the foundations of a consrvatory. There is little chance of getting rid of it. 
    That's really useful to know. Thanks. Would there be any less invasive options which could act as a means to break up the view of the fence (it's literally right opposite the kitchen bi-folds) that would require limited upkeep and would look somewhat modern. I'm thinking about adding uplighting along the bed too.
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