Forum home The potting shed

Show us yer compost corner!

A handy area between the back wall of the garage and the rear boundary fence.  When I didn't have a garden, I pined for composting more than growing - I hated having to put all the fruit and vegetable peels in the landfill bin.  I had that trellis put up and planted a honeysuckle to screen this area from view.  I broke the door of my dalek so it has an improvised patch.  I can never get my leafmould stacks to stand upright.  The two dustbins were left by the previous occupants.  I fill them with as much cardboard as I can cram in, and soak it in "liquid gold".  I catch the first wee of the day in a jug (it's the most concentrated; we're interested in the nitrates, not the water) and trip up the garden with it to dose the cardboard bins.  I fill one a year, and leave it a year to mature.  It doesn't smell nasty; the secret is to add it promptly, before it's had time to produce ammonia.  Makes a useful mulch.  Out of sight behind the dalek there's a lidded bucket of rainwater in which to drown the roots of perennial weeds.

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Posts

  • B3B3 Posts: 17,625
    Mine's an embarrassing but functional mess.
    The picture would do better on GoS
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 17,589
    Same here, very untidy bit of the garden, also in those bright blue large farm containers.
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • FireFire LondonPosts: 9,522
    I'd like to see the compost areas. Since when do they have to be tidy?

    This is mine. Two regular black rubbish bins - on a three month summer cycle. Black Hotbin, kept about 60oC. Green water butt collecting rain from shed roof. Green bin for either leaf mould or wood chip to break down (long term). On left is bug hotel and wood pile, mostly for beetles. It feels quite productive for a small area - about 2m square.


  • B3B3 Posts: 17,625
    Fire! That's tidy!
    Mine is literally a heap up against an old garage. We pull off the stuff on top now and again to get at the good stuff which is piled then up against a fence  and sifted as necessary.  It's powerful weedy but very fertile. It's a great source of seedlings -good and bad ;)
    In London. Keen but lazy.
  • FireFire LondonPosts: 9,522
    It kind of has to be a bit organised or I can't get in.
  • B3B3 Posts: 17,625
    We climb on top or dive in.
    In London. Keen but lazy.
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  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 3,532
    You are all lucky to have this space. I have never had the luxury of a space where one could compost anything. I am very jealous. 
    Dad, could you fit a picturesque chimney pot or two into your garden?  My previous "garden"  was a shingle-covered space about 10 feet by six, house walls on three sides and a 6 foot wall on the fourth.  My mum bought me two old chimney pots for my birthday.  I sat large pot plants on top of them, and no-one could tell that the kitchen scraps and annual weeds from the shingle were rotting away inside them.  One to fill and one to rot, they made lovely compost.
  • FireFire LondonPosts: 9,522
    A nice idea - and warm too.
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 17,589
    edited June 2018
    Blue bags, blue bins, this is our compost are and one of my wildlife areas, I call it that as I’ve never got round to doing anything with it.






    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

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