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Plants drooping a few days after planting

I've created a new border. And some of my new planted perennials are not doing well -- my salvia `nemarosa` and asters have floppy yellow leaves at the bottom and my deschampsia are looking very dry. What could be the reason? I have been watering them every morning, and they are planted in a sunny spot, north-west facing, on improved clay soil. 
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  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 3,532
    How long is it since you planted them?  New plants usually take a while to get going, because to begin with they need to grow roots.  If you could see what was happening underground, you would probably be encouraged!  It's better to water at the end of the day rather than the beginning, so less water evaporates  from the surface of the soil, and the plants have the cool night hours to take it up. If all else fails, and you think you're going lose them, you could try digging them out, keeping the rootball intact as well as you can, pour some water with a drop of liquid feed in it in the hole, and replace the plants.  That will encourage the root growth downwards. 
  • divya84divya84 Posts: 24
    Thanks josusa47, It has been about a week. This is my first attempt at gardening, hence the panic. I'll try watering in the evenings as you say. 
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,071
    Do your droopy plants recover in the evening?
    Do they only droop when the sun is on them?
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • divya84divya84 Posts: 24
    I just looked and some of them are recovering an hour or so after the watering. I think the asters are definitely more droopy when the sun is on them. It is the yellowing bottom leaves that look more concerning. 
  • FireFire North LondonPosts: 15,577
    Adding some mycorrhiza fungi powder can help plants settle and get going quicker.

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,071
    Could you post a photo of them?
    As I mentioned in an earlier post, it's quite natural for recently transplanted plants to droop in mid-summer.
    When you transplanted them, no matter how careful you are, lots of the roots will get broken. They've also got to adjust to the conditions of the soil and micro-climate in your garden.
    At this time of year, the sun is at its strongest and the leaves are evaporating water very quickly, the broken roots can't supply water to the leaves quickly enough to keep them rigid, so they droop. When the sun goes off them, the roots can cope again and the leaves perk-up.

    As to why the leaves are going yellow, a photo would help.
    You may even be over watering them.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 4,677
    Planting in June will normally be like this. Even though most gardeners tell others, they can move things and replant in summer, the bit that is always missed is the lush sappy growth can droop and not do so well once planted. For many plants, it's best to cut down the top growth so that there is less stress. But, if you are watering in the evenings, they will eventually settle in. 
  • divya84divya84 Posts: 24
    Here are some pictures 
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,071
    edited June 2018
    Nothing wrong with them - they're fine, just give some time to let them settle in.
    You could snip off the top 3-4" of the aster as that will be trying to produce flower buds which adds to the stress (as @Borderline says above. You'll still get flowers, just a bit later
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 4,677
    I agree with Pete8 on the photos. They look fine to me. They are young plants, and every blemish shows in a few stalks. A lot of perennials have yellowing base leaves as the season moves on, and a few wilting/drooping leaves are not a sign it's failing, but sometimes a bit stress from heat and new planting. Even the Salvia can do with shortening down to half. The new leaves will look better as at this time of year, it's waiting to be chopped down for new growth into autumn. 
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