Clear pond water

LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 1,672
This is not really a 'problem', just a matter of aesthetics! We made a small pond in March and it's doing well. We had some blanket weed, then it cleared. Everything went a disturbing shade of brick red for a bit, then it cleared. It's been clearish for a while, but I couldn't see the bottom (it's under 2ft deep) just light areas which indicated the gravel covering of the baskets.

But suddenly, overnight last week the water became completely clear. Which is rather nice in a way but it's so clear I can see every crease in the butyl liner, every detail of the planting baskets, every bit of gravel that's fallen to the bottom, every strand of hornwort including the bit of lead weighing it down. I don't really want to see all that, the liner especially is not attractive.

The floating cover is growing well (water lily and water hawthorn) but not covering enough yet. The marginal plants are mainly very vertical. Will it sort itself out or do I need to get more submerged plants? Any suggestions? The oxygenators seem to be doing a good job but would it be sensible to get more? 
'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
- Cicero
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  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 47,973
    With the warm weather you'll probably find that the oxygenators will grow exponentially ... our pond is stuffed full of hornwort ... we thin  it out several times a summer ... but at the moment it's covered with pond snail eggs so it's a fiddly job extricating theits with the eggs on and putting them back in the pond.  
    But if you've got native hornwort it'll fill your pond up and hide the liner pretty quick in our experience.  :)
    "...tea and toasted buttered currant buns, can't compensate for lack of sun because the summer's all gone..."   Autumn Almanac - Ray Davies
  • JellyfireJellyfire SuffolkPosts: 543
    edited 11 June
    You don’t often hear people complaining about the pond being too clear! I am a bit picky myself about that. I’ve poured a load of children’s play sand onto the shelves which covers up most of the liner which is covered in a nice layer of algae and silt now, so looks quite natural.

    Is it a wildlife or fish pond?
    I’ve covered the more awkward bits where the sand won’t work, and covered the planting baskets with pieces of turf. It’s seems to grow quite happily underwater and hasn’t affected the water clarity at all. I wouldn’t think that would work if there are fish though.
    I still have a few creases and seams showing but nothing too noticeable and am just going to let the oxygenators hide those. As to whether you have enough or need more it’s hard to say without seeing it and knowing which you have. Some grow quickly, other less so
  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 1,672
    It has increased, but not much so far - and it's been warm here for a while. But perhaps I need to be more patient! Is yours planted or in weighted bunches, Dove?

    I appear to have imported a pond snail with a purchased plant (which might be linked to the water clearing?). Are there good ones and bad ones: should I be worried or pleased?
    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 21,321
    If you can manage to get in a few plants on the margins that overhang the edges, that can be a big help. Hostas, Carexes etc.
    You can also buy pieces of fabric [?] which have pea shingle attached. I think it's quite expensive, but might be worth considering if you have a particularly dodgy bit. I think most of the pond suppliers stock it.  :)
    to walk through a forest is to touch the past

  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 1,672
    Jellyfire said:
    You don’t often hear people complaining about the pond being too clear!
    I know! I certainly didn't expect to!

    I have a load of sharp sand left over from shaping / padding under the liner. I did wonder about putting some or some gravel, in the bottom. I wonder if it would be too bright against the liner and make the 'problem' more evident though?
    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 1,672
    Fairy, I have planted hostas etc with hope of a little overhang for any exposed bit at the edges - and am (im)patiently waiting for that to happen. The clear water issue is more about everything in the bottom of the pond, and on the shelves, being very visible. I wonder if maybe I should get get more horizontal / creeping marginals?
    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 1,672
    PS @Jellyfire - no fish, no pump. Wildlife-friendly rather than purely for wildlife, I guess.
    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
  • JellyfireJellyfire SuffolkPosts: 543
    The reason I suggested play sand is it’s chemical free, your builders sand may contain all sorts of other nasties. If there are no fish it’s probably not an issue. Patience will sort the problem out eventually one way or another with silt/oxygenators and algae , but I like a quick fix myself. You could just cover up any particularly annoying bits with soil. It’ll cloud the water up, but only for a few days. 
    Pic of the sand attached, you can see it murks up and hides all but that crease popping through but still retains its brightness, that’s a lot less noticeable to me than the liner in the very shallow bits though 
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 47,973
    The hornwort was three weighted bunches ... Just chucked in ... We could now supply most ponds/broads in East Anglia!
    "...tea and toasted buttered currant buns, can't compensate for lack of sun because the summer's all gone..."   Autumn Almanac - Ray Davies
  • LG_LG_ gardens in SE LondonPosts: 1,672
    Ha ha - mine is three weighted bunches too. I await the explosion!

    I would wash the sand / gravel, Jellyfire, in the hope of rinsing off nasties. Yours looks good. I'm still considering it. 
    'If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.'
    - Cicero
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