Wire trellis requirements?

nathanduszynskinathanduszynski Posts: 5
edited June 2018 in Tools and techniques
Hi everyone,

First post so please forgive me if this has already been covered. I've read several articles beforehand. 

We're wanting to grow honeysuckle and potentially another climber or maybe wisteria  (currently unsure what) on a southwest facing wall and planting up the border in front. I've included a photo of the area below which measures approximately 4.5m long. 

I was thinking about putting in 3 fence posts (2.1 high and supported using metposts) and threading wire (spaced 20-30cm apart) between all 3 posts (see photo). I've read that I should use eyebolts and turnbuckles to tighten the wires, but how thick should the wire be? Is 3mm too thick? 

I was also thinking about threading the wire on the outside of the post (furthest from the summer house), so I can use less eye bolts and turnbuckles. Any recommendations or pointers are welcome, we're novices at this and am sure we will learn from a lot of mistakes.


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Posts

  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 4,604
    I used the gripple system from Rivelin Glen 
    It was easy to put up (last autumn) easy to tension, and easy to retension - so far so good
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • pansyfacepansyface PEAK DISTRICT DerbyshirePosts: 14,694
    Gripple is brilliant. The farmers round here use it so it must be good.
    And it’s made in Sheffield, so it is good.
    Apophthegm -  a big word for a small thought.
  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 24,397
    On a slightly different tack - I wouldn't plant honeysuckle in that aspect, unless you live in a very wet area. They can get terribly mildew-y in dry, sunny conditions. 
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • That gripple wire looks so much easier and cheaper than steel wire. I read about a slightly different version on an American site, but it said you had to have a handtool to tension them which was £60 in screwfix. Will definitely be using gripple now. 

    Re: honeysuckle. We don't live in a very wet area, but the soil is always fairly moist as we have a river flowing along the bottom of the garden. Has anyone got any other suggestions for climbers? 
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 4,604
    Star Jasmine - Trachelospermum jasminoides (the white flower). Just coming into flower now with a very strong scent. Grows quickly.
     

    Retensioning the gripple wire is easy. Just hold the 'gripper' bit and pull the wire taught - job done. Mine is still very taught from september last year
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 16,739
    A repeat flowering rambling rose such as Malvern Hills or Lady of the Lake, with a viticella clematis for flower colour contrast.  Have a look at Hawthorne's clematis site as they hold a national collection and will give good advice.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • The star jasmine looks nice and so do a lot of the viticella clematis. I think I'm going to be spoilt for choice. 

    I was thinking I would probably only need 8 plants spaced about 40-50cm apart to fill the area, and will probably go for 2 different species to add a bit of contrast. 

    Is there anything I should avoid with climbers? 
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 16,739
    8 is too many.   Look at plant sizes.   Clematis can take a year or two to get going but then get better every year so don't crowd them out.  Choose one good one for each half of your trellis.   

    Think about after care and annual pruning - Viticellas are cut back hard every year in late winter/early spring.  That will affect a star jasmine when you pull off the dead growth but be of less concern to a rose.  If you do go for clematis, check for planting depth, soil improvers, feeding regime and watering.   They are fabulous plants but hungry and thirsty, especially when getting established.   Some, like Pendragon, are perfumed so double whammy.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 4,604
    My single star jasmine covers an area approx 8ft wide and about 10ft high...
    The clematis growing through it is C.viticella Julia Correvon
    The star jasmine is evergreen and the clematis is cut to the ground mid-Feb every year and it covers a similar area
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • Thanks for the advice. I will have a look at plants and after care. 
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