Compost. Again

FireFire LondonPosts: 5,468
Does anyone fancy arguing about mushroom compost?
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  • The Bald GardenerThe Bald Gardener South West ScotlandPosts: 212
    It's not worth arguing about. ;)
  • Blue OnionBlue Onion Posts: 1,783
    Sure.. why is it so expensive?.. They ought to give it away for free.. it's a waste product of the industry.  
    Utah, USA.
  • The Bald GardenerThe Bald Gardener South West ScotlandPosts: 212
    Whisky is a waste product of grain and water when you think about it. They don't give that away for free, why should mushroom compost be any different. :wink:
  • Blue OnionBlue Onion Posts: 1,783
    No.. grain and water are the ingredients of whisky.. spent grain is the waste product.. which is fed to live stock.  spent mushroom compost is a waste product.. which they sell for more than original purchase price to gardeners.  
    Utah, USA.
  • josusa47josusa47 Posts: 2,402
    If they weren't paid for the compost, we'd all have to pay more for mushrooms.
  • Blue OnionBlue Onion Posts: 1,783
    Don't get me started on bagged manure.. black gold for the farmers.
    Utah, USA.
  • The Bald GardenerThe Bald Gardener South West ScotlandPosts: 212
    But maybe they first mixed the grain and water to get livestock feed......which makes whisky the  waste product. ;)   Anyway, it's meant to be an argument about mushrooms, and it's @Fire what wants one, not me. ;) lol
  • FireFire LondonPosts: 5,468
    Is it good for anything? I have used it for the first time this spring and it seems very dense. Water doesn't seem to seep into it. I'm not sure it was a good idea. At a local GC they are selling it incredibly cheap (compared to other compost / soil conditioners). Like £2 for a 50 ltr bag.  Now I begin to see why. It is the only peat free stuff they sell.

    Some comments on this forum have suggested that both garden compost and bought compost don't have much inherent nutrient content. For that, we or the companies, add slow release fertilizers, manure, comfrey tea etc. If that is so, does that follow for mushroom compost too - that it is basically a matrix for adding soil structure and organicness to lighten clay or enable sandy soils to hold moisture? But adds no nutrient? Peat has no nutrient content?

  • Blue OnionBlue Onion Posts: 1,783
    Yes.  Basically.  I used it when building my lasagna beds.  It was either that or peat bales..I wanted something to help retain water and add instant soilish structure to my chopped plants, leaves, and other materials I used because I made them in the spring and planted them up immediately.  
    Utah, USA.
  • The Bald GardenerThe Bald Gardener South West ScotlandPosts: 212
    Peat holds onto added nutrients quite well was my understanding of compost composition. Hence the added nutrient content. 
    I'd imagine mushroom compost would be a similar set up, a soil improver as you say.  The main benefit being that it will retain added nutrients in the same manner that peat would. 

    But I'm not that all that clued up on this gardening malarkey yet. :)


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