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Anyone can identify these plants and this prunning technique?

greenlovegreenlove Posts: 164
Does anyone know what the name of the following plants please?

The white and the red ones in the first pic and the ones in the following pics


And anyone knows this pruning technique?


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Posts

  • DimWitDimWit Posts: 553
    Guessing...
    1. Red penstemon and white tall campanula (probably Campanula persicifolia)
    2. Exochorda macrantha
    3. Weigela florida sp.
    4. Cercidiphyllum japonicum (Katsura tree)
    5, 6.  Spur pruning.
  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 4,639
    I think picture 3 looks more like a type of Deutzia shrub.
  • AsarumAsarum East AngliaPosts: 567
    Agree with Deutzia.

    Last two - pollarding.
    East Anglia
  • Silver surferSilver surfer Posts: 3,713
    edited June 2018
    I agree with Dimwit except for 3 which as Borderline says is Deutzia sp.

    I would describe the pruning as Pollarding.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=pollarding+trees&client=firefox-b&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj0zPa2i8HbAhVCNMAKHb7SBxAQ_AUICigB&biw=1920&bih=943
    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,619
    Pollarding for me too - used to control tree sizes especially on tree lined streets in towns and willows along waterways.

    Spur pruning is for vines and fruit trees where the aim is to encourage fruit.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • greenlovegreenlove Posts: 164
    Thank you very much guys. I noticed the Deutzia when I went to Dunham Massey. It's right on the entrance to the gardens. At first it looks like a common shrub but once you get near it you realise the beauty of the thousands of the little flowers.

    The Katsura tree is another stunner but from what I could see it grows quite big. Hence why I was asking about the prunning style. I assume that pollarding applies to all the trees? If that is the case it would allow me to get a Katsura in my garden.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,619
    NO.  Look at the RHS site for info on pollarding and suitable specimens.  I don't think it would suit katsura.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Silver surferSilver surfer Posts: 3,713
    No pollarding is only used a a few trees.
    e.g. In London they pollard the London Planes.
    Any sort of pruning would ruin the shape of Cercidiphyllum  japonica.
    They are gorgeous trees but do grow BIG!

    https://www.google.com/search?q=cercidiphyllum+japonicum+tree&client=firefox-b&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjo2ZbegsLbAhVGPsAKHctOBvQQ_AUICigB&biw=1920&bih=943
    Perthshire. SCOTLAND .
  • greenlovegreenlove Posts: 164
    Ah right. A shame. It's such a beautiful tree but its mature shade would just ruin the rest of the garden. Saying that it does tolerate heavy prunning so I might get one and prune it heavily every 3-4 years to keep it at bay.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,619
    I think you'll ruin its shape and the form of this tree is one of its main attractions, along with the foliage and the caramel smell in autumn.   Better to work out exactly what it is you like about it and find something smaller that will come close.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
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