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New hanging basket plant suggestions

Dirty HarryDirty Harry Posts: 993
edited June 2018 in Plants
Put these up today and want to fill them tomorrow.



The wall they're on faces NW so it's in shade all day until mid-late afternoon. Looking at trailing fuchsias for sure, just not sure what other candidates would be best for relatively low amounts of sunshine.

Not after ivy or other 'foliage' plants, the opposite wall has virginia creeper running its entire length already.

Can you get away with planting quite densely in hanging baskets? They're 14" diameter, not sure how many plants I'd expect to put in each though.

Posts

  • InglezinhoInglezinho Posts: 558
    This is way left field for many Brits, but one of my best hanging basket plants is the Epiphyllum cactus. Advantages: if you go away, does not need water. Flowers: senational, spectacular, scented but many types only last a day and only flower at night. Adores sun and heat.
    Disadvantage: Only if you love cactus and are pretty wacky, not hardy. 
    If you do decide to go wacky, an ideal companion plant is the golden rain orchid (Oncidium) also not hardy but you will be guaranteed a unique hanging basket!

    Everyone likes butterflies. Nobody likes caterpillars.
  • FireFire LondonPosts: 14,009
    Inglezinho, the OP is looking for baskets for low light conditions.
    Have you ever been to Britain?

    Trailing begonias are also great, like fuchsias, for low light levels.

  • Dirty HarryDirty Harry Posts: 993
    Fire said:
    Inglezinho, the OP is looking for baskets for low light conditions.
    Have you ever been to Britain?

    Trailing begonias are also great, like fuchsias, for low light levels.

    Funnily enough that's just what I've been looking at now after extensive googling!

    Might keep it simple and just stick with fuchsias in one and begonias in the other. 

    How many plants in each basket is the remaining question. 4 around the outside?
  • FireFire LondonPosts: 14,009
    edited June 2018
    I would go dense, yes. I have found water crystals to be useful (though to some they are controversial) and I use a liner with slits cut a little way up, creating a little reservoir in the bottom.  You could add some slow release fertiliser balls too. Feeding will help the plants stay vibrant through the season. Fuchsias and begonias are wonderful for lighting up a very dark spot.
  • Dirty HarryDirty Harry Posts: 993
    I was going to get water crystals from B&Q anyway so that's good.

    Those baskets come with a plastic sheet lining, I was going to put a few holes in the bottom as I'd read you still want good drainage with baskets.
  • InglezinhoInglezinho Posts: 558
    Sorry, didn't read your post properly. just trying not to be boring.....
    Everyone likes butterflies. Nobody likes caterpillars.
  • LynLyn DevonPosts: 19,889
    Don’t put the holes in the bottom, put them about 2” up then they will retain some moisture instead of it all running straight through.
    If they were mine I would put three fuchsias in one, an upright in the middle and a trailer either side, begonias in the other one.  They don’t look good together especially if you get orange or red begonias and your fuchsias are pink and lilac. 
    Gardening on the wild, windy west side of Dartmoor. 

  • Dirty HarryDirty Harry Posts: 993
    Too late on all counts, I've got 4 each of fuchsia Marinka and begonia Golden Picotee.

     
    The holes in the bottom of the plastic aren't allowing the water to pour out immediately as it's still dripping now and again 3 hours after planting. I mixed in water retaining crystals too.

  • FireFire LondonPosts: 14,009
    Good luck. Enjoy!
  • Dirty HarryDirty Harry Posts: 993
    Thanks. Hopefully in a while I can post another picture with lots of flowers.
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