compost lumps

wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 3,228
I sieved out some Bord Na Mona John Innes No2 to use in a cuttings mix and was left with a big pile of lumpy matter. It's mostly hard lumps of soil, coir like stuff, some leaf mould as well as sticks, stones and shell fragments. So what do I do with it all? This was from one sieve full so I'll have a fair bit from the whole bag. I assume with John Innes that this stuff is part of the 'recipe' so should be broken up and added to the mix. I need a giant pestle and mortar. I'll probably just keep it stored in a bag until I have a big pot that needs filling.

This seems to be the way with most 'composts' now despite the rising prices and smaller quantities in the bags. :/ The seived part was excellent in fairness but from a 20L bag I'll probably actually get 15L or less of good compost.


Posts

  • FairygirlFairygirl west central ScotlandPosts: 25,266
    I know what you mean re the quality, but what can anyone do about it?  :/

    I just chuck it all into a border. I use the one I have on my western boundary which is mainly shrubs - it goes in the back, under the buddleias and pyracantha - next to the fence  :)
    It's a place where beautiful isn't enough of a word....


  • philippa smith2philippa smith2 Posts: 7,189
    JI compost these days is made by anyone - they are supposed to keep to the original formula but often don't.
    Provided all the  leftover "lumps" are organic, they will break down eventually.  As Fairy says, put them on a border and let the elements deal with them.
  • FireFire LondonPosts: 5,368
    I thought John Innes series were always just a recipe.
  • Mary370Mary370 Limerick, Ireland Posts: 1,427
    edited June 2018
    I call them 'nuts' and also throw them  around the shrubs 
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 3,228
    Fairygirl said:
    I know what you mean re the quality, but what can anyone do about it?  :/

    I just chuck it all into a border. I use the one I have on my western boundary which is mainly shrubs - it goes in the back, under the buddleias and pyracantha - next to the fence  :)
    I went with this advice. It'll give the blackbird babies something to chuck about the place anyway.

    I've been getting all my gardening paraphernalia at the same local nursery for 10 years now so I'll mention to them about the quality. They're usually pretty good at being proactive in changing suppliers if they can or offering alternatives if they can't. They've told me a few times that they're struggling to find compost they're happy to sell.

    I doubt it will effect compost in general though. It's the same as bird seed. Even the good suppliers have to bulk out their seed mixes with rubbish now to stay competitive with the companies that sell total rubbish for bargain basement prices. It's the sorry state of the world today. The bottom constantly drags the middle further from the top.
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