An arid bank

Valerie 7Valerie 7 Posts: 34
Hi. My front garden is small, but was very sloped, with bushes forming a boundary along the top between us and next door.  I decided to flatten the front half and use all the soil to create a bank behind some old sleepers, leaving the bushes in situ. It looks really good but the soil on the surface is very dry and bedding plants are struggling to survive. I was wondering if drought resistant ground cover plants may be the way to go and hope that you can suggest some. The bank gets morning sun, but is is shade for much of the rest of the day.
Thanks
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Posts

  • Blue OnionBlue Onion Posts: 1,779
    Could you post a picture, so we can get an idea of the space?
    Utah, USA.
  • Valerie 7Valerie 7 Posts: 34
  • Valerie 7Valerie 7 Posts: 34
    The plants shown in this picture are as they were last year, not long after the bank's completion. This year it doesn't look nearly as good.
  • Blue OnionBlue Onion Posts: 1,779
    It's extremely dry under a hedge.  The roots take moisture from the soil.. and the rain is deflected by the leaves.  Could you put a line of windowboxes along the top of the wall, and grow in those?  
    Utah, USA.
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 1,613

    I've got hellebores doing well in similar conditions but it's rarely dry up here for long. I'd just water and mulch that though to keep the hedge happy. It looks like it needs a good mulch whatever you decide to do. Don't tread it into your carpet though ;)
  • madpenguinmadpenguin Isle of WightPosts: 1,034
    Some sedums might do well along there.
    “Every day is ordinary, until it isn't.” - Bernard Cornwell-Death of Kings
  • Blue OnionBlue Onion Posts: 1,779
    edited 18 May
    Could you put another row of sleepers on top?  Then back-fill with new compost, plant, then mulch.  It would keep the soil from spilling out onto the carpet every time you water or it rains.  Something that trails over the sides would look lovely.. along with some others with upright growth to give it height and color.  
    Utah, USA.
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 1,613
    I wonder if you could tap into that downpipe and make an irrigation setup using porous pipe. Damp shade is a lot easier to deal with than dry shade.
  • Valerie 7Valerie 7 Posts: 34
    I  know that would certainly solve the problem, and it is something that we've talked about doing in the next year or two, once we've got the paving done in that area. There's an old water butt that we're hoping to be able to use as a reservoir, but it needs a stable, raised, platform, just haven't quteq figured out how to do it yet. It's all a DIY job so everything takes time to finish. It would be nice to have the bank looking good in the meantime though. 

  • Lizzie27Lizzie27 Bath, SomersetPosts: 1,580
    It would be easiest just to buy a new water butt, complete with base and connection pipes, they're about £30 for a slimline version. Aldi sometimes do them. I wouldn't advise putting another sleeper on top of the existing as it looks too high already and I guess not secured properly?  They can sometimes slip with the weight of the soil behind.
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