Is it too late/early to plant garlic?

ChriscoreChriscore Posts: 107
I got some from the garden center the other day on a whim but i have realised it needs to be very early spring or autumn. Is it too late?
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  • Joyce GoldenlilyJoyce Goldenlily Posts: 575

    You should get away with it if you plant your garlic now. I have struggled to grow decent garlic in open ground so for the last 2 years have grown it in containers which seems to suit it much better. My crop, sown in the autumn is looking very robust, hope it is not all leaf and no bulbs.

    You need to research garlic before buying any to grow as there are very distinct groups which need different growing seasons. Some like a cold snap for best results. The Isle of Wight Garlic Company sell a wide range of varieties and have a helpful web site. (other companies sell garlic)!

  • a1154a1154 Posts: 666
    I didn’t realise you could plant in spring. I grew enough for a year last season, but now find the lovely fat bulbs hanging up to use have started sprouting. I was going to throw it away but I guess it could be planted then. Garlic and onions go very well in my garden but clearly I’m rubbish at storing stuff. 
  • ChriscoreChriscore Posts: 107

    You should get away with it if you plant your garlic now. I have struggled to grow decent garlic in open ground so for the last 2 years have grown it in containers which seems to suit it much better. My crop, sown in the autumn is looking very robust, hope it is not all leaf and no bulbs.

    You need to research garlic before buying any to grow as there are very distinct groups which need different growing seasons. Some like a cold snap for best results. The Isle of Wight Garlic Company sell a wide range of varieties and have a helpful web site. (other companies sell garlic)!

    Thanks Joyce, i will plant them today, yeah i was thinking of putting mine in containers as i have a lack of space at the moment. I should of researched it but it was kind of an impulse buy haha.
  • ClaringtonClarington Posts: 4,949
    The cold snap needed by some is to cause the bulb to split (i.e. become cloves not just one big bulb). 
    However in a positive way; if the ones you plant now don't come up to scratch at harvest time where's no reason you can't replant next season.
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 1,255
    a1154 said:
    I didn’t realise you could plant in spring. I grew enough for a year last season, but now find the lovely fat bulbs hanging up to use have started sprouting. I was going to throw it away but I guess it could be planted then. Garlic and onions go very well in my garden but clearly I’m rubbish at storing stuff. 
    Don't just bin it. Garlic pickles well or even freezes if needs be. If you can't do that then roast a chicken and stuff it with the cloves, even sprouted ones will give it a lovely flavour.
  • debs64debs64 Posts: 874
    Garlic in a jar of olive oil in the fridge keeps for ages and is lovely to roast potatoes or vegetables in. 
  • Zoomer44Zoomer44 Posts: 2,980
    You've left it too late to plant garlic and expect it to split. Garlic needs at least 30 days of frost, I'm happy to be wrong but that's very unlikely now. 
  • a1154a1154 Posts: 666
    I don’t think you can use it when it’s started sprouting surely? The spout is inside the clove, plus the rest of the clove is woody. If I find any not sprouted I’ll try the olive oil and the freezing too. 
  • wild edgeswild edges The north west of south east WalesPosts: 1,255
    a1154 said:
    I don’t think you can use it when it’s started sprouting surely? The spout is inside the clove, plus the rest of the clove is woody. If I find any not sprouted I’ll try the olive oil and the freezing too. 
    It would still be fine for flavouring food even if you don't actually eat the cloves.
  • Joyce GoldenlilyJoyce Goldenlily Posts: 575
    The flowering heads, scapes, are considered a delicacy in the cooking world. I often chop the leaves up and put into soups for flavouring, also tough cloves can be used as long as they are removed before serving the dish, like using lemongrass.
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