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How can I save my destroyed lawn?!

Jess.halmshawJess.halmshaw Posts: 2
edited May 2018 in Problem solving
Hi all! 

im a newbie here and know nothing absolutely gardening! This is the first garden I have ever owned so bear with me. 

Our lab puppy (who is now over a year old) has destroyed the lawn during his house training period (weeing and pooing on the grass) the grass is dead and burned from the urine. He now goes toilet on all of his walks rather than the garden and I want to save it.

its a new build house so the grass laid out was new. So far I have dug up the bald patches with a pitchfork and spreaded "dog spot" on which is a combination of grass seees and a chemical that is supposed to neutralise the burns from dog urine. That was a few weeks ago and so far nothing has happened.

Can anyone please advise on how I can redeem my lawn? Summers coming and I'd love to sit out there but at the moment it's such a state! 

I have attached pictures. 


Thank you. 

Posts

  • FireFire North LondonPosts: 17,116
    Welcome. The pictures haven't loaded. Could you try again?
  • Dave HumbyDave Humby HampshirePosts: 1,142
    There are several products on the market which are meant to reduce the nitrogen concentration in the pee but I think most folks have found them ineffective in general.

    Where possible I use a watering can to dilute the pee straight away but of course you can't monitor the dog all of the time and continually chase them around after them!

    My solution, which I saw on TV (may have been GW) is to grow new 'lawn' in a seed tray. I then cut out the damaged lawn and replace with a section from the seed tray which I then re-fill and reseed the tray and follow this cycle. I keep two trays on the go and this covers the need through the drier months. In the winter you (generally) don't need to worry as there is enough moisture in the ground to do the dilution on it's own. 
  • Blue OnionBlue Onion Posts: 2,933
    A perfect lawn does not really align with lab ownership.   :)  

    The others will have lots of good advice on improving the brown areas.. but for prevention, I suggest you make a gravel area in your yard for the dog to do it's business (for those times when you don't want to take it for a walk).  Labs are very trainable, and will quickly learn to use a certain spot in your yard with the use of treats and praise.  You don't mention if it's male or female.. if it's a male you might put a 'decorative' rock up in the gravel for it to pee on.  
    Utah, USA.
  • ThankthecatThankthecat North DevonPosts: 421

    My solution, which I saw on TV (may have been GW) is to grow new 'lawn' in a seed tray. I then cut out the damaged lawn and replace with a section from the seed tray which I then re-fill and reseed the tray and follow this cycle. I keep two trays on the go and this covers the need through the drier months. In the winter you (generally) don't need to worry as there is enough moisture in the ground to do the dilution on it's own. 
    What a brilliant idea! I've never been able to mend my dodgy patches of lawn - mainly left from where I've weed killed a particularly big patch of dandelions, and from where plants flop over onto it - because my dogs and cats always destroy the new growth. Thanks for sharing Dave!
  • Thanks for the advice everyone! I think the having a seperate part for the dog to do it's business in apart from the grass is a brilliant idea, one which I was considering because as mentioned, he is very trainable and intelligent dog. He's not destructive to be fair and the poo gets picked straight up it's the pee! However he is trained and will mostly be doing that on walks now. Would I need to dig further with a pitch fork? As I still see a lot of grass seeds just laying there on the soil like on top of it :neutral:
  • AlchemistAlchemist Self IsolationPosts: 266
    Okay, assuming the soil is okay if the grass seeds are lying on top gently rake it in and if you have some compost throw some compost on top (thinly) and gently tread on it to encourage ground contact. You will still see seeds and that’s okay. You also needs to water everyday if there is no rain. Depending on the grass seeds you should see germination within 2-14 days and most seed packets state this. 
  • AlchemistAlchemist Self IsolationPosts: 266
    Here’s an example , if it helps and like you I was confused and this turned out just fine. 

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