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Rose genome sequenced

JoeXJoeX Posts: 1,729
BBC
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-43950743



A bit too technical for me, but if you’re familiar with genetic scientific terms the paper itself is available:
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41588-018-0110-3
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  • IamweedyIamweedy Cheshire East. Posts: 1,364
    This was being talked about on Radio 4 this morning and it was suggested that this DNA sequenceing could help get new varieties.
     I cannot help thinking that this is perhaps a step too far.  Mad scientists and such? We already have lots of lovely roses.  If any of these potential varieties of plants are found to be of theraputic value and put to use in developing new medicinal uses it would be useful. Are we trying to guild the lillies? 

    It is probably possible to say that if you develop a most spectacularly beautiful plant just looking at it might give psychological benefits. 
    I dont know what has come over me today. Probably the first of May.

    Never mind! It's probably my age.  ;);):D
    I am off to the tip with the garden rubbish.



    'You must have some bread with it me duck!'

  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Central Norfolk UKPosts: 77,422
    I do wonder if it's a back door route to making GM more acceptable?   Maybe they think that gardeners are so desperate for a true blue rose or whatever that they'll accept GM for flowers, and then it's just a short step to GM being acceptable for all plants?

    Or am I getting cynical in my old age?
    “I am not lost, for I know where I am. But however, where I am may be lost.” Winnie the Pooh







  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 5,553
    I suspect you may be right Dove - it'll be GM apples, strawbs and plums rather than ornamental roses that are the primary target and the reason they've spent so much money on the work.
    “Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first” 
  • PageZPageZ Posts: 86
    I am curious about what the next step is for the roses. If by doing gene editing, they become more pest/pathogen resistant, drought/wet tolerant, shade tolerant...
  • JoeXJoeX Posts: 1,729
    Cross breeding, hybridizing IS genetic modification  :)
  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 5,553
    Tin pot said:
    Cross breeding, hybridizing IS genetic modification  :)
    it is but with limits. one can't cross breed a banana with a rose. But with gene editing, in theory they can add frog dna to a beech tree. That's not a hybrid in the historic sense and it might well invoke the Law of Unintended Consequences
    “Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first” 
  • JoeXJoeX Posts: 1,729
    I suspect you may be right Dove - it'll be GM apples, strawbs and plums rather than ornamental roses that are the primary target and the reason they've spent so much money on the work.
    Pretty sure the entire study is on roses, focussed on roses and it’s done by academia.  Affiliations are only to other universities and scientific institutes.

    Its all in the paper I linked.  They clearly know a heck of a lot about the history of roses :)
  • JoeXJoeX Posts: 1,729
    PageZ said:
    I am curious about what the next step is for the roses. If by doing gene editing, they become more pest/pathogen resistant, drought/wet tolerant, shade tolerant...
    The researchers have no further planned steps but do note:

    Furthermore, access to candidate genes, such as those involved in abscisic acid synthesis and signaling, paves the way for improving rose quality with better water-use efficiency and increased vase life. Breeding for other characteristics such as increased resistance to pathogens should also benefit from these data and may lead to decreased use of pesticides.


  • raisingirlraisingirl East Devon, on the Edge of Exmoor.Posts: 5,553
    edited May 2018
    Tin pot said:
    Pretty sure the entire study is on roses, focussed on roses and it’s done by academia.  Affiliations are only to other universities and scientific institutes.

    I doubt so much money and resource would have been expended were it not such a very large plant group with a great many food species in it. Even on the radio this morning they mentioned strawberries as one of the 'roses' studied.

    ETA: Taken from the BBC article you linked to:

    It also sheds light on the Rosaceae family, which contains fruits such as apples, pears and strawberries, as well as ornamentals such as the rose.

    "The rose and the strawberry are very close species," said Dr Bendahmane.

    “Light thinks it travels faster than anything but it is wrong. No matter how fast light travels, it finds the darkness has always got there first” 
  • JoeXJoeX Posts: 1,729
    Tin pot said:
    Pretty sure the entire study is on roses, focussed on roses and it’s done by academia.  Affiliations are only to other universities and scientific institutes.

    I doubt so much money and resource would have been expended were it not such a very large plant group with a great many food species in it. Even on the radio this morning they mentioned strawberries as one of the 'roses' studied.
    Have a look at the research paper - I do t see any stats on strawberries, but maybe I missed it.

    Not all university work is privately funded, but if this were, it would be the rose/perfume industry and it would be noted in their paper.
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