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Laurel Problems

Hi, looking for some help and advice please. Not a Gardener, but trying to learn !
We have a laurel hedge as a boundary to our back garden. We're in central Scotland, at about 120m with open fields behind us. So we get some wind. Fields run down towards us too. Planted the laurels about 10 years ago 
1/ most of them grew pretty well once I'd 'discovered' water ! However the 4 at the end stubbornly refuse to catch up. As mentioned, they're now 10 years old.
2/ end of last summer and through the winter saw the rest of the hedge shed a lot of leaves, and become quite bare, to the extent it's now seethrough.
3/ leaves themselves are more yellowy than green

What am I doing wrong ?
Feeding them bonemeal and chicken droppings. Got a simple irrigator that I use in the summer ( when I remember ).

Thanks in advance 

Posts

  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 3,379
    The shrubs look like they are suffering from poor planting/preparation. There is competing grass and possibly soil compaction. You also need to be pruning your shrubs down to maintain bushiness when they were younger.

    I recommend you dig away the grass around the trunk areas and loosen the soil by digging deep holes around the root area, and working in good compost and grit. Feed them afterwards. 
  • Thanks for quick feedback, much appreciated !
    I've pulled the grass back around the trunk area. By deep, you thinking 6" or so ?
    in terms of trim back, they're now 10, take it that's still sensible ?
    Thanks. 
  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 3,379
    I'm assuming you mean 10 inches high? That should be fine. Six inches deep is reasonable depth for your fork to go down. Work in grit or more compost into the holes and top area after removing the grass. Hopefully, your shrubs will start to improve.
  • Sorry, no, 10 years old, though the ones on the right don't look it !!
  • BorderlineBorderline Posts: 3,379
    The shrubs on the right side will benefit if you prune them back a bit after all that. I suggest around one third of their current height. This will help them bounce back.
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