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Devastated!

ThankthecatThankthecat Posts: 421
Aquilegias have been self-seeding happily all over my garden for years and I love them. They've been a huge part of the spring show for me. Last year I noticed a couple of plants were coming up with very yellow leaves but I ignored it - how I wish I'd acted sooner! This year there are hardly any coming up - my favourite, Nora Barlow, is missing - and several plants have the yellow leaves. Finally decided to look into it and it seems they have downy mildew. I think I will lose them all :(
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  • Beaus MumBeaus Mum Posts: 3,550
    So sorry ☹️ I don’t know about this so don’t know how to save them but maybe in the mean time you can make a plea on the plant and seed swap thread. I’m sure many gardeners can help you build up your collection with their seeded plants 🌱 
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 87,852
    edited April 2018
    I think your best course of action is to keep your garden free from aquilegias for a few years in the hope that the mildew will run its course and die out in your area.    If you replant too soon the likelihood is that you'll lose your new plants as well. 

    It's so sad ... I've visited Touchwood and met Carrie and seen her aquilegias ... and now they are no more  .... lots of info about the aquilegia mildew here 
    http://www.touchwoodplants.co.uk/aquilegiaseed.htm  :'(

    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • ThankthecatThankthecat Posts: 421
    edited April 2018
    Thanks Dove, it was the Touchwood site I found that diagnosed the problem. I have to work this morning but this afternoon I'm going out to dig up all infected plants. I can't bear the thought of digging out the few remaining healthy ones so I'll leave them for now. Apart from Nora Barlow I had never bought any - they are all just single vulgaris and had produced the most glorious array of colours, changing every year as they cross pollinated. I suppose I'm hoping the ones that are healthy now might have some kind of resistance... If they are diseased next year then yes, I'll dig them all out and have a break for a few years. I could almost cry.
  • ThankthecatThankthecat Posts: 421
    Before the disease struck, I sent a big packet of seeds to a friend in Scotland. She never planted them out as her current situation is possibly not permanent. Should I ask her to chuck the seeds, or will they be okay as the plants they came from showed no sign of disease? 
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 87,852
    I don't know ... I think you tell her the situation and let her make the decision, or seek advice from the links on the Touchwood site.  

    I bought plants and seeds from Touchwood back in probably 2012/13 ish ... I've not seen any signs of the disease here, so far .... touching wood. 

    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • ThankthecatThankthecat Posts: 421
    I do hope your plants are safe Dove x
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 87,852
    Thanks ... fingers are very crossed  :)

    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





  • Oh heck! I didn't realise they could get diseased! They are so pretty and I've taken them for granted.Will keep an eye on them now.
    The whole truth is an instrument that can only be played by an expert.
  • Janie BJanie B Posts: 951
    ... but is there anything we can do to prevent them getting it...? 
    Lincolnshire
  • DovefromaboveDovefromabove Posts: 87,852
    I understand that it may help if they are not overcrowded ...  :/

    Gardening in Central Norfolk on improved gritty moraine over chalk ... free-draining.





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