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Confused about sun / shade!

ThankthecatThankthecat North DevonPosts: 420
I'm aware I probably sound a complete dunce for asking this, but in my south facing garden one part of it is quite narrow (about 20ft across), with a 6ft fence at either side. The border against the eastern fence gets sun almost all day, but I'm a bit confused about what plants I should be choosing for the border against the western fence. From now until late September-ish it gets full sun until lunchtime but then is in deep shade for the rest of the day. There's no in-between! The soil is moist but free-draining. So what plants should I choose - sun lovers or shade lovers? 

Posts

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,555
    There's an in between - dappled or partial shade.   Go for plants that like that.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Blue OnionBlue Onion Posts: 2,898
    As Obelixx said, partial shade lovers.  There is quite a list of nice plants to choose from.. those types of plants that are found naturally at the edges of woodlands.  Peony, foxgloves, etc.  Or you could go for cane fruit, like blackberries or boysenberries, etc.  
    Utah, USA.
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 8,487
    edited April 2018
    Like you I have a south facing garden and part of it has 6ft fence that faces east (so the fence is on the western side of the garden) and a border that varies between 6ft and 14ft.
    Most things seems to grow well.
    In the 6ft bit I've got several geraniums, bowmans root, penstemons, astrantia, 3 types of mock orange, veronica, campanula, phlox, astilbe, meadow rue and much more. I grow roses along the fence and they thrive
    I think most of the above are happy in sun or part-shade, so I don't think you're restriced
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • FireFire LondonPosts: 13,896
    edited April 2018
    The bed on the side that gets the morning sun will be generally a lot cooler. The afternoon bed will be warmer - both are not equal, even though they get equal light. If you are tempted to plant anything that might require full / lots of sun, plant it on the afternoon side.
  • ThankthecatThankthecat North DevonPosts: 420
    Thanks all for your replies, very helpful as always :)
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