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Acer Palmatum Altropurpureum

I tried planting this in my (Midlands) ornamental garden as a small young plant. However, I nearly killed it and rescued it just in time because I overwintered it in my kitchen and it is now a healthy 12" high plant.
Could anybody advise when and how to reset it back in the garden without risking it.
Thankyou

Posts

  • punkdocpunkdoc Sheffield, Derbyshire border.Posts: 11,199
    At that size, I would keep it in a pot for at least another 1-2 years.
    I would put it outside during the day [ bringing it in at night ] for a few weeks, and then leave it permanently outside; somewhere sheltered and in semi shade.
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  • Allotment BoyAllotment Boy North London Posts: 4,968
    edited April 2018
    In their native Japan & China they survive very low temperatures in the dormant period. As you have had this indoors then yes keep protected for now but once outside leave it out it will go dormant in winter. You may want to protect the pot to stop the root ball freezing if you keep it potted while still small. FD is right wind is a bigger problem than cold.
    AB Still learning

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,561
    I agree with both - when small and in pots they don't like their roots being frozen and, when small, they are safest in pots for a few years before they go into a permanent position in the garden, out of the wind and in dappled shade.

    Do as Pdoc says and keep it safe for a couple more years so it can grow strong.  You'll get a better shaped, bushier plant with less die back of teeny stems.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 27,561
    I agree with both - when small and in pots they don't like their roots being frozen and, when small, they are safest in pots for a few years before they go into a permanent position in the garden, out of the wind and in dappled shade.

    Do as Pdoc says and keep it safe for a couple more years so it can grow strong.  You'll get a better shaped, bushier plant with less die back of teeny stems.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
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