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Safest bird netting?

HelixHelix 704m altitude...Posts: 631
Having had hardly any fruit for the last few years because the bird's take it all we are thinking that this year we will have to invest in a proper cage and net it.  

However we don't want to get birds caught in it.  Any recommendations for the best bird friendly netting?

Posts

  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,555
    The trick is to make it taught so they can land on it without getting their feet tangled in loose, flappy bits.   After that, it's a question of gauge - small enough to keep out small birds but big enough to let in the pollinator insects.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • KT53KT53 GloucestershirePosts: 7,533
    And watch out for the plants you are trying to protect growing out through it.  We were away at the height of the growing season for runner beans and came back to the plants thoroughly entwined with the netting .  It was a nightmare to get at the beans and impossible to separate the netting.  We had to throw netting and bean plants in the bin at the end of the season.
  • HelixHelix 704m altitude...Posts: 631
    Yes, that's why we felt we had to invest in a cage as otherwise can't get it taut.  (Not that I've found a fruit cage round here yet, doesn't seem to be a French thing?)

    But do you think the more expensive thicker stranded netting would be safer for birds rather than the cheaper plastic mesh - is that worth the money I wonder?
  • HelixHelix 704m altitude...Posts: 631
    KT53 said:
    And watch out for the plants you are trying to protect growing out through it.  We were away at the height of the growing season for runner beans and came back to the plants thoroughly entwined with the netting .  It was a nightmare to get at the beans and impossible to separate the netting.  We had to throw netting and bean plants in the bin at the end of the season.
    Thanks!  What a miserable return from holiday....
  • Pete.8Pete.8 Billericay, EssexPosts: 9,861
    I bought from Harrod Horticulture their Storm Proof cages for my veg beds and have been pleased with them.
    Over winter I still had kale etc and when we had heavy snow recently, they done their job -  when the weight of the snow becomes too heavy, the clips detach from the cage and the netting falls rather than the snow causing the frame to buckle, the same happens in very strong winds too.
    If you go for them - do get the corner braces too.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.
    Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,555
    Helix - we will be building our own fruit cage using metal thingies that builders use for reinforcing concrete.   They have 3 or 4 meta rods with cross bars zigzagging back and forth to give the structure which can be just a few inches across and square or rectangular given the model chosen.   We'll get them delivered by Big Mat when we order the roofing timbers to make our raised beds.  As we want it to last a long time we'll also be going for the thicker stranded netting which we've found at reasonable prices online.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • HelixHelix 704m altitude...Posts: 631
    Fer torsadé?    Yes, that's an idea - we use it for making plant supports (thanks to Momty Don for his idea).  How are you joining the bars together?
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,555
    The uprights will be in concrete and the top bars tied in with wire and cable ties.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
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