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Cover for new bank

Hi there, I wonder if someone might be able to advise?
We have a bank next to our driveway, which was until recently held back by a dry stone wall. This week, we've had the wall taken out and the bank cut back about two feet in order to improve driveway access. 
The top of the bank is already well planted with established shrubs, but now there are two things I need to do:
- minimise any slippage of soil
- plant up the bank to improve its look.

Is there any kind of matting we can attach onto the bank which we can plant through? I've seen coconut matting mentioned, would this be a good option? 

I've also been looking at the pregrown wildflower mats for woodland shade areas, but I don't know if they would take well considering that the bank is nearly vertical. 

The area is south-easterly facing, but doesn't get much sun due to being opposite trees and hedges on the other side of the drive, and the conditions are quite dry.

If anyone could recommend what would work best, I'd be very grateful! Many thanks :)

Posts

  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,391
    edited April 2018
    Vinca minor works very well in that situation and helps bind the soil together.  Any place the stems touch the ground, they will root.  I've seen it used to cover 45 degree banks underneath Yew trees where the soil is both dry and shady.  Not even grass or weeds grow where this lesser periwinkle can.
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • ObelixxObelixx Vendée, Western FrancePosts: 28,574
    If it's really vertical why not just re-instate the wall?   That would hold the soil and you could plant alpines in the gaps.
    "We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing." - George Bernard Shaw
  • Vinca minor works very well in that situation and helps bind the soil together.  Any place the stems touch the ground, they will root.  I've seen it used to cover 45 degree banks underneath Yew trees where the soil is both dry and shady.  Not even grass or weeds grow where this lesser periwinkle can.
    Super, thanks! Would you plant through matting / netting or directly into the bank?
  • Obelixx said:
    If it's really vertical why not just re-instate the wall?   That would hold the soil and you could plant alpines in the gaps.
    We did think about having a sleeper wall, but in reality the drive is still quite narrow so we ideally want to maximise the space. My H has scraped his precious car on the wall too many times already for his liking! 
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,391
    edited April 2018
    Vinca minor works very well in that situation and helps bind the soil together.  Any place the stems touch the ground, they will root.  I've seen it used to cover 45 degree banks underneath Yew trees where the soil is both dry and shady.  Not even grass or weeds grow where this lesser periwinkle can.
    Super, thanks! Would you plant through matting / netting or directly into the bank?
    I would try it directly in the bank.  I've seen hexagonal ground control matting used on a steep bank and it is pretty unsightly stuff and is still visible after 2 years.  You could also try adding a few Alchemilla mollis which have really tough roots and will self-seed if happy.
    Hypericum calycinum might be worth trying too but can be more invasive than the aforementioned.


    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • Vinca minor works very well in that situation and helps bind the soil together.  Any place the stems touch the ground, they will root.  I've seen it used to cover 45 degree banks underneath Yew trees where the soil is both dry and shady.  Not even grass or weeds grow where this lesser periwinkle can.
    Super, thanks! Would you plant through matting / netting or directly into the bank?
    I would try it directly in the bank.  I've seen hexagonal ground control matting used on a steep bank and it is pretty unsightly stuff and is still visible after 2 years.  You could also try adding a few Alchemilla mollis which have really tough roots and will self-seed if happy. 
    Great, many thanks!

    Would you think that the site is too steep for the woodland meadowmat I've seen?
  • BobTheGardenerBobTheGardener Leicestershire, UKPosts: 11,391
    Those are basically laid just like turf so if it's too steep to turf then I think it would be too steep for the mat.  Is there any evidence of soil erosion or hasn't it been done long enough to tell?  If the former, I would plant things which have roots which will stabilise the area first, then add interest as time goes by.
    A trowel in the hand is worth a thousand lost under a bush.
  • plant pauperplant pauper Posts: 6,234
    Ay up g kbg. Long time no see.
    A stinky bank eh? I feel your pain. Mine has now extended to 250ft. Vinca, alcholic mollies, even ivy are going in to mine on the steepest part. Meadow ruff too if it ever germinates.
  • Ay up g kbg. Long time no see.
    A stinky bank eh? I feel your pain. Mine has now extended to 250ft. Vinca, alcholic mollies, even ivy are going in to mine on the steepest part. Meadow ruff too if it ever germinates.
    Hellooo, long time indeed! My garden is suffering woefully from my inattention. Luckily the stinky bank isn’t QUITE as big as yours! 

    Bob, it was only taken out on Friday, but given it’s chucked it down solidly for about a week now, I’m surprised it’s as stable as it is so far.
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